• Tamarack Society Update: Part 05

    Hi all! We were doing a pretty good job of steadily working on and providing progress updates about our Tamarack Jackets, but then things got busy around here. Before we knew it half a year had gone by! That doesn’t mean we weren’t paying attention on social media – we’ve loved seeing all of your finished Tamarack’s pop-up in the Tamarack Society Hashtag on Instagram!

    With more of us in the studio, Jen and Lexi have been able to squeeze in a bit of time on their jackets, and Lexi was able to fully finish hers. Scroll down to see more pictures!

    Tamarack Society Update: Part 05 | Grainline Studio
    Tamarack Society Update: Part 05 | Grainline Studio
    Tamarack Society Update: Part 05 | Grainline Studio
    Tamarack Society Update: Part 05 | Grainline Studio

    Lexi chose to quilt around the pattern on the fabric and put a lot of thought into cutting out her jacket pieces. She is an expert at pattern matching and this coat truly highlights her skill. She chose to make a longer version by lengthening the jacket approximately 10 inches (25.4 cm).

    Tamarack Society Update: Part 05 | Grainline Studio
    Tamarack Society Update: Part 05 | Grainline Studio

    She chose to add some visual intrigue along the side seams by adding an inset panel. To do this, she sewed the side seams to about hip length and left them open below that point. Then she bound the jacket front seams, sewed on the inset panels, and bound her side seams and the inset panel seams as one continuous seam.

    Tamarack Society Update: Part 05 | Grainline Studio

    Lexi is excited to wear this showstopper later this Fall. We’ll be back with an update on Jen’s finished Tamarack as soon as it’s complete. Finger’s crossed for a 2019 finish

  • Grainline Studio Sew Visible Project

    Grainline Studio Sew Visible Project | Grainline Studio

    A global study performed by Dove showed that 70% of women don’t feel represented by images they see in advertising. Feedback from our sizing survey supports this finding, and many participants expressed a desire to see new patterns shown on a variety of bodies.

    Inclusive representation is important, and a recognized limitation of working with one model per pattern release is that the resulting images only show the patterns on one body. We’re fortunate to have a huge community of sewists who share the garments they sew using Grainline patterns on social media channels; it allows for realistic and diverse portrayal of people in our patterns to circulate in the world. That said, we don’t want you to have to wait for hashtags to fill up in order for you to visualize yourself in one of our patterns. We want you to discern how a garment sewn with a Grainline pattern might fit on your body as soon as it’s released.

    So, we’re reaching out to the real people who make up this community and asking for your help in providing authentic and inclusive representation as part of the Grainline Studio Sew Visible Project. We’re looking for people who are interested in sewing our forthcoming patterns and then sharing pictures of themselves in their completed garments to social media on release days. We’ll send you new patterns prior to their official release and provide compensation.  

    If you’re interested in getting involved, please click the image above and fill out the form so that we can learn more about you and contact you if selected. We will be selecting a diverse group of makers from the pool of applicants and plan on working with a different group of people for every launch. To be considered for our upcoming pattern release please fill out the form no later than June 21st, 2019 at 5:00 pm CST. Feel free to share the Grainline Studio Sew Visible Project link with anyone you think may be interested. We’re looking to represent diversity in all forms and we need a pool of diverse applicants to do so. If selected we will reach out to you with more details.

    Thank you for your support!

  • Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Fruit Pouches

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Welcome back to our Fabric Scrap Busting Series! We were blown away by all of the great comments, suggestions, and ideas community members provided in response to our first post in the series. You can check them out on our Instagram page.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    In today’s tutorial we’re showing you how to turn your scraps into fruit themed zippered pouches. The inspiration for these incredibly cute bags came from the above pictured leather fruit pouches Jen spotted a few weeks back on Cuyana. We originally had something else planned for today’s scrap busting series, but when we were looking through our leather scrap drawer and saw that we had pink, green, and yellow scraps on hand it felt like too big of a coincidence to overlook.

    If you don’t have leather scraps you can still make these pouches. We recommend using thicker weight woven fabric scraps or interfacing your pieces so that your pouches retain your shape. In addition to the fabric you’ll also need a zipper and thread. Our pouches are big enough to hold a few small items, but they don’t fit a cell phone. Feel free to make your pouches, or fruit, as small or large as you’d like! We’re not providing a pattern template this week as these shapes are easy to draw on your own using any circular object. Scroll down for detailed steps on how to make a watermelon and jumbo lemon.

    Watermelon Zippered Pouch

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    To get started you’ll need two half circles of any size of your main fabric, two small rectangles in your main fabric, a longer rectangular piece of fabric in contrast fabric whose width will be determined by your zipper plus seam allowance and whose length will be the same as the length of the rounded edge of your fabric plus seam allowance, a zipper, thread, marking tools, leather needles, and clips to hold your pieces together while sewing. Any hole you put in the leather will remain so we recommend clipping your pieces together versus pinning; however, you can pin pieces together within the seam allowance if needed. When in doubt cut out larger pieces – you can always trim things to size if needed.

    Begin by placing the left side of your zipper along the straight edge of one of your half circles with the right side facing down. We positioned our zipper so that the start of the teeth and zipper stop were approximately 1 inch (2.54 cm) from either end.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Use a zipper foot to sew the zipper at 1/8 inch (0.32cm). Start where the zipper teeth begin and stop at the zipper stop. Flip the seam allowance to the wrong side and press.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Place the right side of your zipper right side facing down along the straight edge of your other half circle. Clip in place. Be sure to place your zipper at the exact height you placed it at on the other half circle. Pull the zipper closed and flip everything so that the right sides are facing up and double check to ensure everything aligns before sewing. Sew from the start of the zipper teeth to the zipper stop at 1/8 inch (0.32 cm).

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Cut two smaller rectangles out of your main fabric. These should be cut at a width of your zipper plus 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) and the length will be based on the measurement from the start of your zipper teeth to the edge of your main fabric plus seam allowance on both edges. As mentioned previously, it’s better to cut this longer than you might need as you can always trim it down to size if it is too long.

    Fold the short edge of one of your rectangles under by 1/4 inch (0.635 cm) and topstitch 1/8 inch (0.32 cm) away from the folded edge. Repeat steps for second rectangle.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    You are now going to attach the two rectangles to either end of your main zippered piece. Starting at either end, clip your rectangle piece to the zipper only. Sew the rectangle to the zipper starting on one side, pivoting at the corner, going across the previously topstitched edge, and up the other side at 1/8 inch (0.32 cm). Repeat on the other end.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Topstitch along both edges of your main fabric.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Measure and cut a rectangle in a contrast fabric. The measurements will be determined by the width of your zipper and length of the rounded edge of your main piece plus seam allowances. We didn’t have one piece that was long enough so we cut two and sewed them together in order to make a long enough piece.

    With right sides facing each other, attach the long edge of the rectangle to the rounded edge of the main piece. Align the center of the rectangle with the center of the curve.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Carefully sew using 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) seam allowance being sure to ease as needed to avoid puckers. Pink and clip your seam allowance to create a smooth curve.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Press the seam allowance down towards the contrast fabric and topstitch 1/8 inch (0.32 cm) catching the seam allowance in the process.

    Repeat the previous steps to sew the remaining raw edges together. Make sure your zipper is open so that you can turn everything right side out at the end. When you topstitch this second edge you might not be able to sew all the way up to the edge closest to the zipper on either sides due to the limitations of the pouch opening. We recommend starting in the center and topstitching as far as you can up one side and then repeating in the opposite direction.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Turn your pouch inside out and align the top edge of your main rectangle with the top edge of your contrast rectangle. Sew whatever seam allowance you included when measuring both pieces – for us this was 1/2 inch (1.27 cm). Trim, turn right side out, and enjoy your new bag!

    Lemon Fruit Pouch

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    We can’t get enough of this jumbo lemon! The bright color and circular shape make it fun and functional. We’re already planning on bringing it to the beach, to summer festivals, and wherever else we end up this summer.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    You’ll need two circular pieces of fabric, three rectangular pieces that are half the length of the outer edge of your circle and a width of your choice plus seam allowances, a zipper, and thread.

    Place your zipper along the edge of one of the rectangles with right sides facing together. Use a zipper foot and sew at 3/8 inch (0.95 cm).

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Flip to the right side and press.

    With right sides facing sew the second zipper edge to right edge of your second rectangular piece at 3/8 inch (0.95 cm).

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Flip to the right side and press. Grab your remaining rectangle and clip the short edges together with right sides facing. Align the center of the short edge with the center of the zipper.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Sew at 1/4 inch (0.635 cm). Flip and press.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Topstitch at 1/8 inch (0.32 cm) and again at 1/4 inch (0.635). Repeat the previous steps on the opposite side to create your outer rind.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    With right sides facing, clip one of your circle pieces to the edge of the loop you previously created. Sew at 1/2 inch (1.27 cm). Pink and clip your seams to create a smooth curve.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Press the seam allowance towards the loop and topstitch 1/8 inch (0.32 cm) from edge.

    Repeat the previous steps with your remaining circle. Be sure to open your zipper so that you can eventually turn your pouch right side out. When topstitching, the opening of the zipper may prevent you from topstitching around the circle entirely. We recommend starting at a central point and going in one direction as far as you can go and then repeating in the opposite direction.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio

    Feel free to attach a chain or trim a small leather or fabric piece and loop it through your zipper to make pull tab.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Zippered Pouches | Grainline Studio
  • Uniform Tunic Modification 01: Uniform Shirt

    Uniform Tunic Modification 01: Uniform Shirt | Grainline Studio
    Uniform Tunic Modification 01: Uniform Shirt | Grainline Studio

    Today, we’re sharing two of our favorite, incredibly simple, modifications that transform the Uniform from tunic to shirt! These quick adjustments increase the number of options this incredibly versatile pattern offers. The Uniform Shirt is the perfect alternative for you if you don’t think of yourself as a tunic person.

    Please note that you will need the Uniform Tunic pattern to complete this modification. Looking for resources or additional help sewing up the pattern? You can access our sew-along page here: Uniform Tunic Sew Along

    Uniform Shirt Modification - Option 1

    Uniform Tunic Modification 01: Uniform Shirt | Grainline Studio

    The modification for Option 1 is barely a modification – just leave off the skirt!  You won’t be able to include the inseam pockets if you choose this modification, but you could always draft patch pockets and add them to the front of your shirt if desired.

    Uniform Tunic Modification 01: Uniform Shirt | Grainline Studio

    We’re using the round neckline pattern piece illustration, but the modification is the same for round or v-neckline options. Assemble your bodice front through Step 2 of the instructions.

    Uniform Tunic Modification 01: Uniform Shirt | Grainline Studio

    To finish the Bodice hem, fold 1/4 inch (0.635 cm) along the bottom edge of the Bodice to the wrong side and press. Fold and press at 1/4 inch (0.635 cm) again and edgestitch the free folded edge.

    Pick up the instructions at Step 15 or Step 21 depending on the sleeve option you’ve chosen and follow through to finish your Uniform Shirt!

    Uniform Shirt Modification - Option 2

    Uniform Tunic Modification 01: Uniform Shirt | Grainline Studio

    The straightforward pattern modification for Option 2 allows you to make a Uniform Shirt without sacrificing any design features. By applying a length change between the lengthen / shorten lines on your bodice piece, you are able to make your Uniform Shirt as short as you prefer. Additional length can also be taken away from the hem of the skirt front and back pieces and pocket pieces if needed.

    Uniform Tunic Modification 01: Uniform Shirt | Grainline Studio
    Uniform Tunic Modification 01: Uniform Shirt | Grainline Studio
    Uniform Tunic Modification 01: Uniform Shirt | Grainline Studio

    Start by cutting between the lengthen / shorten lines marked on the Bodice front piece. Overlap the two sections by the amount you want to shorten your piece, and make sure to keep the grain line of the two pieces aligned. Remember to factor in seam allowance when you remove length. Shortening this piece will cause the dropped waist seam line to hit higher on the torso. We recommend making a muslin to determine your optimal length.

    Trace your overlapped piece, including all notches, onto a separate piece of paper, and blend any gagged edges along the side seam. Repeat the adjustment to your back piece as well.

    Proceed to cut out your remaining pieces and follow the instructions to complete your Uniform Shirt!

    Are you envisioning any other modifications to the Uniform Tunic? Feel free to let us know in the comments below.

  • Introducing the standalone release of the Uniform Tunic!

    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio

    We are so excited to release this standalone Uniform Tunic pattern. The Uniform Tunic was originally released as a traceable pattern in the collaboration book Uniform-Knit & Sew with Madder. We received numerous requests to release the Uniform as a standalone pattern from people who wanted printed and PDF versions of the pattern that didn’t require tracing as well as those who weren’t interested in purchasing a knitting book. This brings us to today!

    The pattern was designed as a choose your own adventure sewing pattern. While we have provided four options for you, the possibilities are endless as all of the design features mix and match! This makes it easy to sew a version of the pattern that works for you. Choose between your favorite neckline, skirt, sleeve, and pocket option.

    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio
    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio
    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio

    We suggest using light to medium weight woven fabrics such as cotton, linen, voile, and chambray; but, we also love how it looks when made up drapier fabrics like tencel or silk noile. We’ll be sharing multiple versions over the coming weeks to showcase the difference in fit and look of the garment in different fabrics.

    Read about the design features of the pattern below!

    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio
    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio
    1. Two neckline options: choose between a round or V neckline. Both are finished with a facing that’s edgestitched down to keep it in place.
    2. Two sleeve options: choose between a sleeveless version finished with a bias facing or set in bracelet length sleeves
    3. Bust darts: provide a flattering fit!
    4. A topstitched drop waist or generous inseam pockets
    5. Two skirt options: a straight skirt fits closer to the body while the lapped skirt option provides more room for movement
    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio
    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio

    We’ve provided four example options of how you might mix and match the design features of this pattern to get you started. Option 1 is a sleeveless and features the rounded neckline, inseam pockets, and straight skirt.

    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio
    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio

    Option 2 features the v-neckline, bracelet sleeves, drop waist seam, and lapped skirt.

    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio
    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio

    Here we’re showing Option 3. This option features a round neckline, long-sleeves, inseam pockets, and the lapped skirt.

    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio
    Introducing The Standalone Release of the Uniform Tunic | Grainline Studio

    This is Option 4 on the pattern envelope: a sleeveless v-neck version with a straight skirt.

    Grab your copy of the Uniform Tunic below and stay tuned for additional posts featuring Uniform Tunics in different fabrics as well as modifications you can make to the pattern. Back when Uniform – Knit & Sew was originally released, we put together a series of posts to ensure a smooth sewing experience with the Uniform Tunic pattern. Click here to read more about fabric choices, supplies needed, common adjustments, and sew-along posts.

    Make sure to use the hashtags #uniformtunic and #grainlinestudio so we can see your versions! Let us know below what you think of the pattern and the options of the pattern you’re planning to make.

  • Printing Layered PDF Patterns

    Our Uniform Tunic PDF pattern is our first layered PDF pattern file, and we plan on continuing to layer our pattern files with our future releases. Layered PDF pattern files include all of the sizes in the same file, but they are stacked on top of one another on separate layers. This allows you to deselect sizes you don’t need and select the size, or sizes, you need before printing. You can save printer ink and have an easier time tracing off or cutting out your size.

    Below, we’re illustrating how to use a layered PDF pattern.

    Print at Home Layered PDF

    1. First make sure you have the most recent version of Adobe Acrobat on your home computer. You can download the free software from the Adobe site here . While there are many different PDF readers, they are not all created alike. Acrobat provides the most consistent printing of any we’ve come across.
    2. After you have downloaded your .PDF files (we recommend downloading to your desktop if possible for easy access) open the print at home pattern file in Acrobat.
    3. Your file should open to the first page of the pattern.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    4. Open the Navigation Pane on the left hand side of the window, by clicking the highlighted area.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    5. If you don’t see the Navigation Pane you can access it by clicking View and then Show/HideLayered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    6. Click Navigation Panes and then select Layers. This will cause the Navigation Pane to open.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    7. Click the Layers icon to display the pattern sizes.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    8. Click on the eye icon to select or deselect sizes. Active layers, those with the eye visible, will be printed.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    9. If you’re in between sizes you can still select the varying sizes you need and blend between them.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    10. Once your sizes have been chosen proceed to printing.
    11. The highlighted areas below show the correct settings for Actual Size printing. You want to make sure Actual Size is checked. You will also see the page fit on your 8.5 x 11 in the US or A4 in the EU in the document window to the right of the image below.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    12. Before printing the entire pattern, print out just the first page to make sure that your 3 in. x 3 in. square measures correctly — and if it does go ahead and print out the rest!

    Copy Shop Layered PDF Printing Instructions

    1. If you are in the US you can send the full sized copy shop version of the pattern to any service bureau capable of printing 34″ wide. If you are located in the US we recommend using Fed Ex Kinkos and their Large Format Black and White Printer. Another resource is PDFPlotting.com.
    2. A0 files are included for print bureaus outside of the US.
    3. All PDF files should be printed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Access is restricted to editing programs such as Photoshop, Illustrator, and Indesign and as such, they will not print the files.
    4. You are able to select the size or sizes you need printed in the copyshop file by following the same steps listed above. We’ve provided a few screenshots below to illustrate this. Layered PDF Printing | Grainline StudioLayered PDF Printing | Grainline StudioLayered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio