Stonecutter Progress

Grainline Studio | Stonecutter Progress

I don’t know if many of you guys knit, but I’ve been working on this sweater, Stonecutter, for something like a year, which in sewing terms is a SUPER long time. I took basically the entire summer off because the yarn was not pleasant to knit with in the hot, humid Chicago summer, but after months of on and off knitting I finally finished all of the pieces! I’ve been Instagramming (@grainlinestudio) the progress and I thought it might be fun to compile those photos here.

Grainline Studio | Stonecutter Progress

I’m about to start blocking the sweater and I’m putting it off a bit. It seems like from my IG query a lot of you block on spare beds, unfortunately I only have one (which I need to sleep in) and I have a hunch this thing will take more than the waking part of a day to dry, so I’ve ordered some blocking wires & a little fold up board to block it on. Hopefully that does the trick. I’ve been working on this for so long I definitely want to spend the time to do it right! I’ll also need to block it at work because as you can see from the photos, Roamy thinks I’ve been working hard all these months to make her the world’s most intricate and warm cat bed/toy.

I just cast on for the Purl Bee Boyfriend hat as a simple next project while I decide what comes after. So many good knits out there it’s so hard to pick my next year long project, though I’m due to clock in at 2 sweaters in one years time if I get this done before mid-November, so maybe it’s uphill from here? Fingers crossed

(Ravelry Project Link)

Also I’m over on the Fringe Association blog today talking about my knitting tools, etc. on Karen’s Our Tools, Ourselves segment. There’s a little about my sewing tools on there too if you’re not a knitter, so check it out here if you’re interested! If you’re stopping by from the Fringe Association blog, hello!

24 replies on “Stonecutter Progress

    • Jen

      It was such a fun knit, I kind of think you’re the queen of cable design! I’m hoping they come soon so I can finish this up and start wearing it! I’m pretty sure Ondawa is next, is it weird that I feel like you designed it just for me? Haha!

      Reply
  • sewlittletimeblog

    i block on top of a laundry rack (for drying clothes on) covered with a towel. it’s too wobbly for the cat to sit on and you can pin the edges out to size on the towel. looking forward to seeing the finished garment!

    Reply
  • Hyemi

    I block my stuff on the floor by laying down some towels (so the pins have something to go through), with a layer of cut open garbage bags on top of the towels. Towels alone will just absorb the moisture from the knit and it’ll never dry. It’s pretty make-shift, but it generally works okay. Also, putting the knit in the spin cycle if you have a washing machine wrings out a lot of excess water and it dries a lot quicker.

    Reply
  • deuxsouriceaux

    I bought one of those Styrofoam sheets from the hardware store (had them cut it in two because it was too long). I was something like 10$. I have enough space to block a sweater. Shawls, it depends on the size. If I had somewhere safe on the floor (two cats and two kids mean nowhere is safe), I could put the two sheets side by side and have plenty of width for a shawl.

    Reply
  • Grace

    I love that boyfriend hat! I’ve made a bunch of them, usually used a superwash cashmere dk for the inner facing.

    Do you ever hand wash sweaters? I have a round drying rack for sweaters that pops open and I prop it on top of my clothing drying rack to dry my sweaters. I know, this isn’t the same thing as blocking, but I don’t aggressively block my cabled sweaters. I save my wires for blocking lace because I want the pattern to open up. With sweaters I just roll out as much of the excess water as possible before setting it up to dry flat. I usually start on the bed, but move the pieces to the drying rack once they are closer to done. Perhaps you could bring the damp sweater to your studio to dry flat without cat interruption?

    Reply
  • tresbienmichelle

    This sweater will be worth the year you put into it once it’s finished! Those cables are gorgeous! Whenever I block sweater pieces, I have to make sure to close the door to the room I’m using, or I’ll have three dogs rolling and nesting on top of things.

    Reply
  • Heather Lou

    Love seeing all your pretty IG stonecutter pics together! You’re making me feel better about my #brooklyntweedbffs slooooow progress. I haven’t had a lot of TV/downtime lately so my poor Bedford is sitting in its lonely bag, waiting to be loved again.

    Reply
    • Jen

      Hahaha yeah, don’t stress about that sweater. I didn’t start making any sort of progress on this thing until I moved the biz out to a separate space. Now in the evenings I just don’t know what to do with myself 😉

      Reply
  • Meg

    Wow! That is a great sweater! The blocking wouldn’t be my hang up( I block on a fleece blanket on the bed–that way when it is time for bed I can carefully move it to the floor. I only use wires and pins for lace.). My hang up is seaming. I have a sweater in pieces stilI from one I knit for my husband ( then boyfriend)over ten years ago. Now I only knit in the round:)

    Reply
  • Melissa

    Looking good! I’ve had this in my queue for awhile, but Michele’s Ondawa just jumped ahead in line. Good call on the blocking board. I couldn’t live without mine, it’s probably the most useful and necessary tool I have besides my knitting needles!

    Reply
    • Jen

      I think that might be my next knit, it’s SUCH a good sweater! Are you using the required yarn? I think Ondawa is something I’ll wear a ton so I kind of want the sweater to be a little softer than the BK Shelter, but I love the look of it. So torn!

      Reply
  • Katie Emma

    If you have one, point a box fan at your drying pieces – it’s probably pretty obvious, but it’s surprising to me just how much faster it speeds up the drying process. And use a ruler when you block the pieces to make sure things are the right size – it’ll make seaming a lot easier!

    Reply
    • Jen

      I do have a fan, such a smart idea, I’ll definitely be doing that! I have a feeling the cabled Shelter is going to be a beast on the drying process 😉

      Reply
  • Julie

    Nice job on the sweater, Jen, and I enjoyed your interview on Karen’s blog. I first “met” you when you posted your Benton sweater on the SSKAL forum and love your work. You’ve even renewed my interest in sewing, which I haven’t done seriously for years.

    I’ll be interested to hear what you think of Shelter after you block the sweater. I’m considering trying it for the first time on an Ondawa, but it feels a bit scratchy to me. I have heard that it softens with blocking, so let us know what you think! (No pressure…)

    Reply
    • Jen

      I’ll definitely let you know! I’m really thinking Ondawa will be my next sweater, I just can’t resist it, but I’m considering a different yarn. I’m hoping the Shelter softens up because I love the look of it and it’ll work great b/c I’ll be layering Stonecutter, but I’m imagining myself wearing Ondawa with a tank so I’ll need it to feel great against the skin! Also so happy I could play a small part in getting you back into sewing!

      Reply
  • Mady

    Love seeing all your progress pics on IG! Your knitting skills are really impressive! I don’t think I’m at the point where i have either the skills or the patience to tackle a project like this.I decided to start knitting a simple sweater for now in order to work on my skills, but really it’s about building my patience! Can’t wait to see how it’ll look once you finish it!

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  • Meg White

    Nice work! I think you`ll find that you don`t need blocking wires. I only use them for lace shawls. Personally I just give my sweaters a good dunk, roll them in a towel and stand on it to blot the water, and then pat them into shape on a fresh towel on the floor. You can also block them with steam from the iron, and they won`t take so long to dry. I love those cozy cables! You are really inspiring.

    Reply

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