Cascade Sew Along

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Next up in the Cascade Sew-Along is applying either your collar or hood. Today I’ll be showing you how to attach your hood. In the booklet and samples, View A is shown with the collar and View B with the hood but the two are completely interchangeable. Begin by pinning the center back seam of the under collar pieces together with the right sides facing each other.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Stitch the two layers together and press the seam open.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Next, again with the right sides facing, align the under and upper collars along the outer edges and stitch the two layers together.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Grade your seams and either notch or trim your corners. I like to trim down the entire corner to about 1/8″ instead of notching, it usually gives a much smoother curve. For an explanation of the differences between the two methods, you can check out this tutorial.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Head over to your ironing board and press the seam allowance and the under collar away from the collar.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

You’ll now want to understitch along the seam line through the seam allowance and under collar. Since the rounded edge of the corner is too tight to neatly understitch you’ll just be doing this on the straight sides and back edge of the collar.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

You’ll now have something like this. You can see how the understitching makes the seam line want to naturally roll to the underside of the collar, this is helpful in the next step.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Press the collar flat making sure that the seam allowance rolls to the underside of the collar and that the raw edges of the upper and under collar meet.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Pin the two layers together and stitch along the raw edges of the collar at 1/4″ or somewhere within the seam allowance. This ensures that the two pieces act as one while attaching the collar stand.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Next you’re going to pin the non-interfaced collar stand piece to the collar with the right sides facing. Make sure you’ve matched your notches and your seam lines at the edge. Stitch the two layers together along the 1/2″ seam allowance.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Clip the pointed ends of the collar stand so that it’s flush with the edge of the collar.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Notch and grade the seam allowance of the collar stand.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Now align the interfaced collar stand with the upper collar side of the collar. With right sides facing pin in place matching notches and seam lines.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Stitch through all layers. I stitched with the interfaced collar stand facing towards the feed dogs so I could follow the stitching line I previously used exactly. This ensures that you don’t see any of the previous stitching when you flip the collar stand back over.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

This is what you’ve got after the last step. Do as you did for the other collar stand, trim the points flush, grade, and notch the seam allowance.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Press both of the collar stands down, I find this easiest to do on top of the ham, wool side up as I mentioned a few posts back.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

After you’ve done that, run a line of topstitching along the collar stand curve to anchor the two layers together. Alternately you could stitch in the ditch along the curved collar / collar stand seam. I don’t recommend putting a line of stitching along the collar side of the curve since depending on where it’s placed it can affect the roll of the collar. Once you’ve done this, run a line of stitching inside the seam allowance at the bottom raw edge of the collar so that it acts as one layer when attaching it to the neckline.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Illustrating the roll of the collar and stitching lines.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Now we’ll attach the assembled collar to the neckline of the coat. Begin by laying out the coat with the right side facing up and the under collar facing up. This is how the collar will end up attached to the coat in the end.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Fold the collar down over the coat so that the under collar is facing the right side of the coat. Pin in place matching center back, shoulder seams, and the front edge of the jacket.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

When placing the front edge of the collar with the coat you want the finished edge of the collar to fall at the 1/2″ seam allowance of the coat edge.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Stitch through all layers of the collar and neckline. If your fabric is particularly bulky like my this Pendleton is you may find it helpful to use a walking foot and possibly increase your stitch length to help the fabric move through your machine.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

You can see here how the edge of the collar and front band match up at the corner of the 1/2″ seam allowance. This is how you know that your collar and band will both meet exactly at the corner of the coat.

Cascade Sew-Along: Collar | Grainline Studio

Your collar is now attached! Next up, assembling and attaching the hood.

 

 

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Cascade Sew Along

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

Today we’re turning our coat pieces into something you can actually wear, side seams & sleeves! Begin by sewing the coat fronts and backs together (with right sides facing of course) at the side seams and sleeves.

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

Press both your shoulder and side seams open. Set the body aside.

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

To sew the sleeves begin by aligning the outer seam of the upper and lower sleeve pieces. Pin in place making sure you’ve matched any plaids, stripes, or prints if you have them. Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

Stitch along that seam and press the seam allowance open. As usual I’m pressing my wool on the wool side of my ham.

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

Next align the inner seam, again matching anything that needs to be matched, and stitch along the 1/2″ seam allowance.

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

Press this seam open as well. This step will be accomplished much more easily with the aid of a seam roll.

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

You will now have this beautiful little sleeve. Our next step is to place two lines of basting stitches around the cap of the sleeve.

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

The basting lines should run between the front and back notches up around the cap of the sleeve. Since we’re working with 1/2″ seam allowances I recommend placing the first line at approximately 3/8″ and the second at 5/8″ this way the sleeve cap gathering is held in place on either side of your stitching line which makes it much harder to get any tucks in your cap.

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

With the right sides of the sleeve and the coat facing begin pinning the coat and sleeve layers together. Begin with the side seam of the coat which will match to the underarm notch on the sleeve. From there work up matching both the front and back notches of coat and sleeve; the sleeve cap notch will align with the shoulder seam of the coat.

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

From there place a few pins between the notches as needed using the basting stitches to ease the sleeve cap into the armhole.

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

Stitch around the armhole and remove your basting stitches. Repeat these steps for the other sleeve.

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

Cascade Sew-Along: Side Seams & Sleeves

Your coat now has sleeves! It will look a little funny if you try it on since we haven’t pressed the bands down the front of the coat yet, we’re saving that for after we insert the lining. We’ve not got something decidedly coat like at this point and I’m sure you are now starting to feel like we’re nearing the finish line. Next up are two posts about finishing that neckline. The first will be assembling and attaching the collar, and the second for the hood. See you back here for those next week!

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Cascade Sew Along

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

Today we’ll be attaching the toggles to the coat. Begin by placing your clasped toggles across the front of your coat to double check that the toggle strap length is correct before they’re permanently affixed to your coat. You want the toggles to clasp tightly across the front of the coat, especially if the cord is leather since it can tend to stretch with wear. If you need to make any adjustments to the placement do that now.

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

You’ll want to make sure you’re working with a leather needle if you’re sewing leather. The sharp tip of a leather needle is shaped a bit like a knife allowing it to easily slice through the leather without skipping stitches like you would with a regular needle.

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

I recommend sewing one test toggle if you’re sewing through leather. It feels a bit different running through your machine than regular fabric and since leather doesn’t heal after you puncture it like fabric does, once you’ve pierced it the hole is permanent. You’ll want temporarily affix your toggles to the fabric using either tape or a fabric glue stick so that the toggle doesn’t move around while sewing.

Please note: If you are making your toggles with the suede side of your leather facing up do not use tape. Get a glue stick. You guys know I’m not really into buying extra things when you can get away with using something you have but trust me on this. I taped the first of the Pendleton toggles (shown at the bottom of this post) and it took me about 15 min and lots of silent yelling to get the tape off of one toggle tab. There also may be a small piece stuck under the stitching that I have decided I can live with…maybe.

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

Practice stitching around the toggle until you get a feel for how the leather moves under your machine. This also lets you test out how far in from the edge you like the stitching to fall.

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

Once you’ve got your stitching worked out you can go to town on your actual toggles. I like to start with the loop side of the closures but it doesn’t matter which side you sew first. Don’t backtack through the leather, instead leave a long thread tail and start at one of the corners which we’ll tie off later to keep the stitching in place. Sew the straight edge, then curve around the back to where you started. When you get to the end, again do not backstitch and leave another long thread tail.

You’ll notice the green foot on my machine above, it’s a Teflon foot. Leather can be sticky on the bottom of your foot but the Teflon foot lets it slide smoothly. You can alternately try a walking foot or some people like putting scotch tape on the bottom of their regular foot. That works but I don’t like the fact that the tape can leave a residue on the bottom of my foot. Bernina feet can be a bit expensive so I like to take a bit more care with them.

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

After you’ve cut your threads, pull the front threads to the back of the garment and tie everything off to secure your stitching.

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

Sew all three toggles on that side in the same manner as the first.

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

Repeat these steps for the other side of the coat.

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

All your toggles are now attached!

Cascade Sew-Along: Attaching your Toggles

For View A we sized the toggles down a bit and shaped them into triangles to go with the print of the Pendleton Wool. The toggle buttons are actually antlers too which is so awesome! When I saw them show up on Sara’s Instagram I immediately contacted Fancy Tiger so I could have some of my own. I think they’re perfect for this coat!

Next up, sewing the side seams & inserting your sleeves.

 

 

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Cascade Sew Along

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Today we’ll be attaching the front bands for View B including the zipper panels. Remember, either view can be made with or without the zipper so don’t feel like just because I’ve omitted them in View A and used them in View B that you need to do the same.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Lets start with the right side of the zipper band. Align the zipper along the edge of the band with the right sides facing each other and baste the two layers together. When stitching you’ll want to fold the edge of the zipper over at the end so that the excess tape doesn’t get stuck in the top seam of the zipper band. You can see how I did this in the photo above.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Repeat this step for the other side of the zipper.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Now place the other layer of the zipper band over top of the ones you just made creating a sandwich with the right sides of the bands facing and the zipper between. Pin.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Stitch along the top, zipper side, and bottom. Grade your seam allowances.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Repeat for the other side of the zipper. Turn your bands right side out and press. Zip the two sides together to make sure that your tops and bottoms align. Once you’ve done that and everything is in its proper place, run a line of stitching along the open edges of the bands so that the two layers act as one while attaching it to the coat.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Assemble your front bands using the instructions in the previous post Front Bands: View A.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Now we’ll attach the bands to the front of the coat. Begin by aligning one of the bands with the interfaced side facing towards the coat. You’ll want the finished edges of the band to sit 1/2″ from either edge of the coat.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Stitch the band to the coat at approximately 1/4″ so that the stitching line falls inside of the 1/2″ seam allowance. You can alternately change your machine to a larger basting stitch if you prefer rather than stitching inside the 1/2″ seam allowance. I don’t like removing stitching so that’s why I always stitch inside the seam allowance. 1/4″ allows me to still grade the seam without the tedious basting stitch removal.

Stitch the band to the coat at approximately 1/4" so that the stitching line falls inside of the 1/2" seam allowance.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Now place the right zipper band on top of the band you just stitched to the coat. This is the size of the zipper with the pull. Align the band 1/2″ from the top of the front band and pin in place.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline StudioCascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Head over to your machine to stitch the zipper band to the coat. You may want to increase your stitch length as I did to help your machine more easily get through so many layers of fabric.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Now align the two halves of the coat front and transfer the placement of the right zipper band over to the left side of the coat. Pin the band in place between these markings and stitch the zipper down inside of the 1/4″ seam allowance.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Once the zipper band is in place, repeat the previous step marking the placement of the front band. As with the right band you’ll want the left band to fall 1/2″ inside of each end of the coat front but more important is the fact that both bands line up. You can always slightly fudge the seam allowance and nobody will be the wiser as long as the bands line up. Stitch through all layers at the 1/2″ seam allowance.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View B | Grainline Studio

You’ll now want to lay out your coat fronts next to each other and make sure that everything is properly aligned. Zip the zipper and give that a check as well. If anything needs to be adjusted you can do that now before we attach the toggles in the next post.

 

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Cascade Sew Along

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View A

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View A | Grainline Studio

I’m showing View A in the sew along without the zipper. It feels a little less formal to me and when I’m wearing a short jacket I’m not as concerned with it closing as tightly as I am with a longer coat. To assemble the bands for View A begin by taking your interfaced bands and laying them out to double check that you have two opposite bands as above.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View A

Fold the bands in half with right sides together so that the raw edges touch and stitch the short ends together. Your interfacing will cross the halfway mark, this is not an error. This reinforces the edge and helps keep it strong and in its proper shape.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View A

Snip the corners and grade the fused seams.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View A

Turn the bands right side out and press the edges you just sewed as well as the center front fold line nice and flat.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View A

Run a line of stitching along the open edges of the bands at approx. 1/4″ so that it falls inside of the seam line.  This makes the two layers act as one when you attach them to the front of the jacket.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View A

Line your bands up with the side of the jacket just to double check that everything lines up as you expected.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View A

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View A

Pin the front bands to the front of the jacket making sure that the band falls short of the edges of the jacket by 1/2″ on either side of the band.

Cascade Sew-Along: Front Bands View A

Stitch the two bands into place along the 1/2″ seam allowance.

Next Up: Attaching the front closures for View B

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Cascade Coat Pattern Update

Hey there guys. I’m completely crushed to report that there is an error in pieces 28 & 29 on View B of the pattern. I’ve uploaded a 5 page PDF update for the two pieces which you can download below. The center front bands of View B are slightly too long on sizes 0-14, evening out to the correct length at size 18. The silver lining I suppose is that nothing is too short which means that you can just trim off the excess without wasting any fabric. This mistake happened during the final layout of the pattern for print & pdf which is how we missed it during the extensive testing process, because it didn’t exist at that point. We strive for professional, easy to use patterns and I apologize wholeheartedly for this error.

Download the Updated Pieces 28 & 29 Here

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Uncategorized

Cascade Sew-Along Update

Just wanted to let you all know that I haven’t forgotten about the sew-along, just got that lovely flu that’s going around and haven’t been able to post. I’ll be resting up over the weekend and we’ll resume on Monday. Apologies for any trouble or frustration the delay may cause you.

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Cascade Sew Along

Cascade Sew-Along: Making Your Own Toggle Closures

Cascade Sew-Along: Making Your Own Toggle Closures | Grainline Studio

I know a lot of you are planning on making your own toggle closures so I thought I’d slip this post in before we attach the button bands so that you’re all ready to go and can sew your toggles on straight after that step. If you need a supply list for making your own toggle closures, please check out this post on gathering your supplies.

Cascade Sew-Along: Making Your Own Toggle Closures | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Making Your Own Toggle Closures | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Making Your Own Toggle Closures | Grainline Studio

Before you start you’re going to want to lay down some paper to work on top of. Believe me you do not want to super glue anything to your nice table. Okay. You can start by tracing your toggle pattern piece onto heavier paper or just glue it on like I did. This isn’t a necessary step but I find it much easier to trace the toggles onto leather when they’re on thicker paper than the tissue.

Cascade Sew-Along: Making Your Own Toggle Closures | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Making Your Own Toggle Closures | Grainline Studio

Trace your toggle onto the leather. You’ll need three closures so cut 6 tab shapes out of the leather. I used a sharpie to trace mine on, then just made sure to cut away any markings.

Cascade Sew-Along: Making Your Own Toggle Closures | Grainline Studio

You’ll then need to cut your leather lace into the proper length for your closures. To some extent this will depend on the type of toggle button you’re using, how far apart the holes are and how thick the button is, but for mine I found approximately 7″ worked well. When marking how long to make your lacing you’ll want both ends to fall towards the center of the toggle closure with the button hitting in the center of the front band.

Cascade Sew-Along: Making Your Own Toggle Closures | Grainline Studio

For the toggle button side of the closure, thread the lacing through the buttons making sure that nothing is twisted.

Cascade Sew-Along: Making Your Own Toggle Closures | Grainline Studio

Place a dab of your glue in the center of the toggle tab and stick your lacing down. You’ll want to give it a good press to make sure it’s held in place properly but don’t use your finger! Take an old pencil or something you don’t mind super gluing and use that to press it in place.

Cascade Sew-Along: Making Your Own Toggle Closures | Grainline Studio

Repeat the same steps, minus threading the button, for the other side of the toggle closure. Make sure your toggles are completely dry before you attempt to attach them to the coat. I like to let mine dry overnight because better safe than stuck to your coat!

Up next, attaching the front zippers, bands, and the beautiful toggle closures you just made. Stay tuned!

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Cascade Sew Along

Cascade Sew-Along: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

In today’s Cascade sew-along post we’ll be assembling the fronts and backs of your coat as well as making and attaching the pockets. Lets dive in! Just a note, I’ll be demonstrating the bulk of the sew along on View A. Since this coat is smaller it fits better into the camera frame and allows us to see the details better. When View B differs from View A I’ll add those instructions in. View B is made in a solid grey wool so you’ll be able to tell which one I’m working on at a glance.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Start out by marking your toggle placement on your front yoke and front body if you haven’t done so already. Since we’re going to be doing a lot to the front of the coat before it comes time to attach the toggles I like to mark the front edges of mine with large hand basting stitch. This stitch is both easy to remove when the time comes and easy to work around up until that point.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

With right sides facing each other align the front yokes and front body pieces.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Grade the seam allowances of the yoke edge of the two seams.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Head over to your iron and press the seam allowances up towards the yoke. If you have a sleeve roll you can place it underneath the seam with the wool side facing up. The wool on the sleeve roll will hold heat and steam allowing the seam to set a bit better and crisper as the wool cools. You can also apply pressure to the seam using a press cloth which does the same thing as the wool side of the sleeve roll. Personally I use my palm or inner forearm since they work just as well though I’d recommend that you buy or make yourself a press cloth.

Another thing I like to do in conjunction with this while pressing wool is before pressing straight onto my wool seam, I first give the entire seam a hefty steam from the iron. I will then finger press the wool over to mold it around the seam. Wool loves to be molded with steam, it’s almost more important than heat, and this way you can make sure that everything is in its proper place before you give it a solid iron press.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

After pressing the seam allowance up, topstitch along the yoke side of the seam allowance at 1/4″.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Repeat the previous steps for the back of the coat.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

For View B you’ll need to attach the lower body piece. The instructions for doing this are almost identical to the instructions for attaching the yokes. Pin the upper body and lower body together with right sides facing matching notches. Stitch the two layers together.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Grade the seam allowance of the lower body.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Press the seam allowance down towards the hem of the coat and topstitch the seam on the lower side of the seam.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Repeat these steps to attach the lower portion of the back of the coat.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

The next step is to place your pocket interfacing and mark your pocket placement. You’ll want to make sure that the top and sides of the pocket interfacing will extend beyond the top and sides of the pocket by about 1/2″ then fuse it in place according to the instructions included with your fusible.

I then like to draw a line with a ruler between the two pocket placement points on the back of the pocket and place a running stitch between the two points so that you can see the placement on the front of the coat.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Now we’re going to construct the pockets. You’ll notice that the pocket and pocket lining are different widths, this is not a mistake, the pocket lining is smaller in order to force the wool over ensuring that the lining isn’t visible when your pocket is sewn in place. Align the two edges of the pocket and pocket lining along the un-notched edge and pin in place. Place a third pin into the center of the layers, you’ll want to evenly ease on either side of the center pin.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Grade the seam allowance of the pocket lining.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Press the lining up away from the pocket run a line of stitching across the lining next to the seam line.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Fold the pocket and lining together so that the right sides of both are facing each other. Since the pocket is longer than the interfacing it creates a small facing at the top of the pocket. You’ll want to make sure that each side of the facing have the same measurement. It should be approximately 1″ though depending on your stitching it could vary by a sixteenth of an inch or so. Just make sure both are even to avoid a lopsided pocket.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

I like to sew the two sides of the pockets separately, I find it’s a bit easier to be accurate this way since you’re stretching the lining to the edge of each side of the pocket. Align the edges of the pocket and lining and pin in place. Stitch from the top edge, down the side and around the bottom of the pocket stopping at the first notch you come to. I like to use this perfect points technique at the corners to get sharper corners that don’t bow out at the sides. Repeat for the other side of the pocket.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

In these photos you can really see how the wool being larger than the lining will pull the seam line towards the underside of the pocket.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Trim the corners of your pocket and grade the lining seam allowance.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Turn your pocket right side out through the hole you left in the bottom.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Slip stitch the hole closed, then head over to the ironing board and press your pocket flat.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Align your pocket with the pocket placement markings on your coat. Measure over from the center front edge to make sure the pocket is parallel to the front of the coat.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Pin the pocket in place.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Stitch the pocket in place around the sides and bottom following the directional layout of stitching above. The triangle tack at the top of the pockets is optional but it holds the stress of using pockets better than if you just straight stitch around the three sides.

Cascade Sew-Along Day 04: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets | Grainline Studio

Your pockets are now in place and you’re ready for the next step, of attaching the front bands and toggles. We have one post before that happens, how to make your own toggles since a lot of you have mentioned that you’ll be creating your own rather than using pre-made.

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Cascade Sew Along

Cascade Sew-Along: Cutting & Prepping Your Pieces

Cascade Duffle Coat Sew-Along: Day 03: Cutting & Prepping Your Pieces | Grainline Studio

Today I’ll be guiding you through selecting your size, cutting, and prepping your pieces to begin sewing. Lets start by getting out our pattern booklets and looking at the size chart and finished measurements.

Cascade Duffle Coat Sew-Along: Day 03: Cutting & Prepping Your Pieces | Grainline Studio

I’ve highlighted my sizes in the photo above, 2 in the chest, 4 in the waist, and 4 at the hip (thanks yoga!). I could cut between the two sizes but since I wear a lot of oversized tops & bulky sweaters, I’m going to go straight 4.

You’ll notice that the finished measurements include quite a bit of ease from the body measurements. You may have the urge to size down quite a bit, but remember, this is a winter coat that you may want to layer over a sweater. If you’re going to make a muslin for this pattern, I recommend using a fabric with a similar weight to your final fabric if possible. An unlined muslin shell of the coat will feel much looser than the final thick, lined wool (or medium weight twill if you’re going that route).

One thing you’ll want to take into consideration is if you are interlining your coat with Thinsulate or something similar, you will want to go up a size because of the bulk involved. Trust me, I learned the hard way.

Cascade Duffle Coat Sew-Along: Day 03: Cutting & Prepping Your Pieces | Grainline Studio

Cascade Duffle Coat Sew-Along: Day 03: Cutting & Prepping Your Pieces | Grainline Studio

This coat has a lot of pattern pieces, 40 in total, but luckily you don’t need all of them if you’re only making 1 version of the Cascade.

  • No matter whether you’re making A or B you’ll need all the pieces found in the section labeled Pattern Inventory Views A & B, which is pieces 1-14 and piece 40 if you’re making your own toggles.
  • For View A you’ll additionally need the pieces in Pattern Inventory View A, pieces 15-25.
  • For View B you’ll additionally need the pieces in Pattern Inventory View B, pieces 26-39.

I find it helpful to cut all the pattern pieces out and then sort them into piles based on what fabric you’re cutting them from. I would have a pile for self, a pile for lining, a pile for contrast (because I’ll be using contrasting fabric on my zipper bands and hood lining), and a pile for interfacing. 4 total types of pieces. Some are cut from more than one fabric, in that case start them out with the pieces you’ll be cutting first, then move them over to the next pile when you’re finished.

I won’t be showing you step by step how to lay out your fabric – since this is an advanced pattern you should be familiar with using a cutting layout diagram and I really want to spend more time on actually sewing the coat. If you have questions you can see this post on cutting from the Alder Sew-Along.

Cascade Duffle Coat Sew-Along: Day 03: Cutting & Prepping Your Pieces | Grainline Studio

Cutting Your Self Fabric

Before you start cutting your fabric make sure that you’ve pre-treated it using the same method you plan on using to launder it with once it’s finished. For cotton, you can toss it in the washer / dryer and be done with it. With wool, most likely you’ll be dry cleaning the fabric. Some people like to put their wool in the dryer with damp towels but I’ve never done that so I can’t recommend or not recommend that method. Occasionally if I have a sort of questionable wool source I’ll take the yardage in to get dry cleaned before I get started. This usually happens when I’m purchasing from a jobber who may not always list, or know, the complete content. Any dry cleaner will do this and if you think your dry cleaner might find it strange (mine likes to tease me about weird things I bring in sometimes) don’t worry about it, just tell them it’s a blanket. If I’m working with good quality wool and I’m confident I know the complete fiber content (usually 100% wool), I just give it a good steam press before cutting and get to it. I’ve personally never had any trouble with shrinkage from dry cleaning after the fact.

Cascade Duffle Coat Sew-Along: Day 03: Cutting & Prepping Your Pieces | Grainline Studio

Matching Stipes, Plaids & Prints with a Two Piece Sleeve

If you’re using a fabric that has a print, stripe, or plaid you’ll most likely want to match your print across the pieces of the coat. I have a tutorial for plaid matching here (the same method applies for prints & stripes) but since this pattern has a two piece sleeve that slightly complicates things.

Everything is the same as the tutorial I linked to, except for the two piece sleeve. To mark that you’re going to want to take the two pieces of sleeve and align them with each other along the side seams. From there you can mark a line across the underarm of the lower sleeve piece and transfer that to the upper sleeve. Since the side seams are matched up your print will match across the two pieces.

Cutting Your Lining

As for the lining, if you’re using Bemberg you’ll want to do a full press of the fabric prior to cutting because it does occasionally shrink with heat. I usually do a press with light steam on both sides of the fabric prior to cutting. If you’re using cotton or flannel, again wash the fabric in the same way you intend on laundering the final garment.

While I love the Bemberg on the body and sleeves of my coats, I like to cut my zipper bands and hood lining out of a more decorative fabric. You can use flannel for the entire lining of the coat, I did this on the original grey version of this coat, but one thing I’ve found is that sometimes the friction between the flannel and the garment you’re wearing underneath can result in the coat creeping up your leg a bit.

Cutting Your Fusible Interfacing

Since we’re not using bonded fusible for this coat you’ll want to make sure you pay attention to the grain line on your pattern pieces. In addition to fusing the standard pieces such as the facings and front bands, we’re also going to fuse a few high stress places. The point of this is is to reinforce the fabric in the points that wear faster than other non-stress points of the coat. We’ll be reinforcing the yokes and around the armholes as these places take a lot of stress from the arms moving as well as the area behind the pockets.

Cascade Duffle Coat Sew-Along: Day 03: Cutting & Prepping Your Pieces | Grainline Studio

Prepping Your Pieces

The last thing we’ll cover today is prepping the coat to begin sewing by fusing all interfacing. Make sure you use a press cloth between the iron and the fusible to keep your iron clean. Follow the instructions included with your fusible interfacing to adhere the interfacing to the self fabric. If you need further instruction on this please reference this post.

Next up: Assembling the Fronts, Backs, and Pockets & Attaching the Pockets to your coat

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