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Introducing The Morris Blazer

The Morris Blazer | Grainline Studio

I’m so excited to finally announce that the Morris Blazer is now available for purchase! Now lets get to know the Morris a little better.

The Morris Blazer | Grainline Studio

I originally designed the Morris back when I was still doing Hound and produced it for 2 seasons (Fall ’11 and Spring ’12) before I quit to have more time to pursue Grainline Studio. That blazer was a crazy seller, I don’t even want to think about how many Morris Blazers I’ve made. I loved that blazer as soon as I finished the first one and honestly haven’t stopped loving it since. I find that I wear the Morris most during the spring – summer – fall seasons since it’s perfect for tossing on in changing weather as well as all those overly air conditioned places I find myself in all summer long. It’s casual enough that you can wear it daily but doesn’t look out of place dressed up a bit as well.

The Morris Blazer | Grainline Studio

Garment Details The Morris Blazer is the perfect mix of casual and cool. It will quickly become the go-to garment to complete any outfit. With a mixture of drape and structure, bracelet length sleeves, and gentle shawl collar, it looks great dressed up or down. It works up well in fabrics with stretch, making it comfortable on top of everything else!

Techniques involved include sewing a straight seam, setting sleeves, sewing a shawl collar, facings, and topstitching. Pattern is nested to facilitate cutting between sizes if needed.

Both the woven and knit version follow the same instructions and you do not need any knit-specific sewing equipment for this pattern. The only thing I used a serger for was to finish my seam allowances.

The Morris Blazer | Grainline Studio

Suggested Fabrics One of the things I’m most excited about with the Morris Blazer is the fact that it’s drafted so that you can make it in both stretch wovens or stable knits meaning lots of flexibility! The navy blue blazer was sewn up in stretch wool suiting which has such an amazing drape. The striped blazer is Ponte knit which looks pulled together but feels like you’re wearing an undercover sweatshirt. Since both fabrications involve stretch you don’t need to worry about feeling restricted as some blazers can do. I’ve also made one up in French terry which has a bit more drape than the ponte and it worked out quite well. The blazer is unlined.

The Morris Blazer | Grainline Studio

Difficulty The Morris Blazer is rated Advanced Beginner because of the shawl collar. We always strive to make sure that every step involved is clearly explained so if you’ve got a garment or two under your belt you should be just fine with this one.

I can’t wait to see Morris Blazers popping up here and there, I know a few of you have been waiting on this one for a while. As always we’ll be doing a sew along – I know a lot of people find them boring – but I think it’s a nice courtesy to offer to customers. No date on that yet since we’ve abruptly found out last week that the Grainline Studio studio is moving, but I’ll update you with that as soon as I know.

One last thing. If you’re purchasing the print version of the Morris Blazer they won’t be shipping out until after May 1st. I apologize for the inconvenience but we’re currently in the middle of packing up the entire studio for the move this weekend and I don’t predict us being able to ship much of anything – especially since the new patterns still need assembly – before then. I would never have planned a move to coincide with the launch of new patterns but things happen and you get through them the best you can. Kendra and I, with the help of a small team of friends, will be working super hard to make sure you get them asap though!

GET YOUR MORRIS BLAZER PATTERN HERE!!

48 Comments Posted in News, Patterns
Uncategorized

The Moss Skirt Now in Print

The Moss Skirt Now in Print | Grainline Studio

In addition to the Morris Blazer dropping today we’re also adding a both a printed version of The Moss Skirt as well as an updated PDF to the pattern library!

I’m super excited about this new PDF and printing of the Moss because there are a few things we finally got to update due to customer feedback:

First of all, the Moss has been lengthened a smidgen which is something I noticed a lot of people were doing in their versions of the skirt. It is a mini so View A isn’t knee grazing by any means, but it does have more length to it than the original version.

Secondly a lot of people had a hard time attaching the waistband properly. I noticed that people were coming up exactly 2″ short no matter what size they were making. After a lot of re-testing and going back and forth via email and Twitter with customers we discovered it was because they were sewing the waistband on upside down. This shouldn’t happen with one of our patterns so we’ve gone in and added more notches which should cut down on this happening in the future.

One last thing. If you’re purchasing the print version of the Moss Skirt they won’t be shipping out until after May 1st. I apologize for the inconvenience but we’re currently in the middle of packing up the entire studio for the move this weekend and I don’t predict us being able to ship much of anything – especially since the new patterns still need assembly – before then. I would never have planned a move to coincide with the launch of new patterns but things happen and you get through them the best you can. Kendra and I, with the help of a small team of friends, will be working super hard to make sure you get them asap though!

10 Comments Posted in Uncategorized
Sewn Garments

Kendra’s Plaid Flannel Archer

Kendra's Plaid Flannel Archer | Grainline Studio

So, spring is taking a little longer than I’d like to get here or should I say get here and STAY here. Although we have had some wonderful sunny, 60-70 degree days here in Chicago, we have also had some cold, grey, and rainy ones. To combat this bizarre in-between weather, I decided to make a new flannel to cheer me up! I feel like all I want to make right now are Archers and Alders and I have bought and looked at a bunch for great fabrics from different places, however when it came to this flannel, I fell victim to…the impulse buy.

Kendra's Plaid Flannel Archer | Grainline Studio

I was stopping into Joann’s to pick something up (just a couple of things, I swear…) and of course started wandering around and I stumbled upon this great fabric!I love the colors and it’s great shirting if you are looking to save a couple bucks. After I washed it, the grain got a little wonky, but it wasn’t too hard to work with. I found it was easier if I didn’t go for lining all the plaids. I was a bit worried about how it would look with the plaids alternating at the seams, but I have to say I really liked the effect in the end! I wanted it to be super comfy and oversized, so to get that look, plain and simply I cut a size larger than what I normally would. Voila!

 Kendra's Plaid Flannel Archer | Grainline Studio

I’m really excited about this piece over all. It’s great for the weather right now with a jacket open over it and it will work well with the sleeves rolled up when it starts to get a bit warmer. And come summer, it will be perfect for early morning trips to the farmers markets with shorts or over a swimsuit at the beach in the evening. Very happy with this boyfriend fit flannel, maybe my dude will start stealing my shirts for a change…

10 Comments Posted in Sewn Garments
Life Lately

Life Lately v.03

LIfe Lately v.03 | Grainline Studio

Things have been moving at quite a clip behind the scenes lately which has left me with less than ample time for coming up with blog posts. I feel like there are so many things I need to fill you in on or that I want to talk about so I figured I’d give you the Cliff’s Notes version for now in the form of another Life Lately post and potentially expand on these ideas at a later date. As with all of these posts, the images are pulled from my Instagram account (@grainlinestudio) where I try to post daily with what we’re up to.

In all this scurrying around I did take a day off last week to sew an Archer (not pictured), two Lindens and a raglan tee from my personal pattern collection, and just in time for Me Made May! I’ve got a few more ideas for things I feel like I *need* to get sewn before May 1st – you know how that goes – so hopefully I have a free minute or two to squeeze those in! I’m getting excited about my second Me Made May, I definitely filled in some wardrobe gaps over the past 12 months. Will you be participating this year?

LIfe Lately v.03 | Grainline Studio

Recently I’ve noticed two real workhorses in my wardrobe. If you know me in real life you know I have a bit of a uniform, I’m not sure how much of that comes across via the internet, but I’m sure you’ve noticed at least a bit. I’ve made three of these oversized raglan tees now and they’re hands down my new go-to favorite for when I’m working. I don’t like things restricting my arm movements at all when I’m working so this is perfect. As the seasons change – spring is finally here!! – I’ve been wearing my Bellows cardigan almost every day as the coat-sweater I intended it to be. I knew I would love this sweater before I started knitting it, but I didn’t realize how quickly it would become an everyday garment!

LIfe Lately v.03 | Grainline Studio

While we’re on the subject of wardrobes, I downloaded the Into-Mind Wardrobe Workbook last week on a whim after seeing it mentioned more than a few places recently. I’ve enjoyed Anuschka’s posts for a while but never thought I was the wardrobe workbook type and after perusing it I actually still don’t think I am. The workbook looks pretty amazing, super thorough and covers basically every aspect of building a wardrobe in depth, but it’s also a bit of a time commitment and I don’t really feel like I have that much of a wardrobe ‘problem’. Since reading through it I’ve been noticing more similarities in the things around me though, for instance, my outfit, bags, couch, new fabric, and plant, as well as my filing cabinet and its contents all coordinate. Ha!

LIfe Lately v.03 | Grainline Studio

You may remember that sweater I’ve been working on for the Sunday Sweater KAL? The one where I knit the front, back, and one sleeve, decided I was knitting too dense of a fabric, ripped everything out, and went up two needle sizes. Ooph!! Well, I’m now finished with the new front and back and will be starting on the sleeves this week just as soon as I adjust the math for my new gauge. I’m so excited, I can’t wait to finish this thing up!

LIfe Lately v.03 | Grainline Studio

And last but not least Kendra and I have been working like crazy on patterns. The next release is at the printer and we should be getting them in the next two weeks. The first is the printed version of the Moss skirt and the second is that long awaited Morris blazer! A lot of people have asked about the fabric on the Morris, I’ve drafted it for use with both stretch wovens and stable knits. Think stretch wool, ponte, etc. More on these soon though!

22 Comments Posted in Life Lately
Sewing Tutorials

Appliqué Linden Tutorial

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Today I have another Linden Sweatshirt tutorial for you, I’ll be demonstrating how to appliqué your Linden with a fun phrase or word. I’ve been seeing sweatshirts pop up for sale with appliquéd phrases on them, usually either French or funny, but I thought it would be fun to make one of my own! You should have most of the supplies to make this sitting around with the exception of perhaps the fusible and stabilizer but it’s a great project for using up great print scraps leftover from other projects. So lets gather our supplies and jump in!

Project Supplies

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Start by brainstorming a few words or phrases you might want written across your Linden. Try out different fonts and see what you like. I like to place my text on top of the front of the shirt to test the size, just remember that you have to stitch around every edge of your lettering so simple is best. Although it’s cute, something like the bonjour would be a lot of stitching.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

After you decide on your text, you’ll need to reverse the type and cut it out. You can either reverse it on the computer in an editing program such as Photoshop or Illustrator, or you can cut your letters the right way round and flip them over.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Now we need to prep the fabric you’ll be using for your lettering. Press your fabric and cut a piece of double sided fusible large enough for your text. Fuse the non-papered side of it to the wrong side of the fabric according to the instructions included.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Trace your lettering onto the paper side of your fused fabric and cut it out. When you flip the letters fabric side up they’ll be the right way around because we traced them out upside down.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Peel the paper backing off your letters and arrange them how you’d like them to appear on the front of your shirt. I find a ruler or two very helpful at this stage. With the paper removed the letters should be just slightly sticky – enough to get you over to the iron to affix the letters. If this isn’t the case you can stick a pin through each letter until you’re at your ironing board.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Cover your letters with a press cloth and iron the letters to set the fusible. Again follow the instructions that came with your interfacing for this step.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Since were going to be stitching on top of a knit fabric we’ll need something to keep the knit fabric from moving around and stretching out of shape, this is where your tear away stabilizer comes in. Cut a piece large enough to cover all your text, I cut mine about 3/4″ larger than the block. Place it behind the text and pin it in place.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Our next step is stitching around the letters using a zig zag stitch. Before you start on your shirt, it’s not a bad idea to do a practice letter to get your stitch length and with in order, practice turning, and decide on a thread color. I used regular thread for this but if you happen to have embroidery thread laying around you’ll get a much finer outline around your letters.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Once you’ve worked out your stitch, start outlining your letters. When it comes time to pivot, make sure your needle is at the outer corner before you turn your work as in the photos above. This will ensure that you’re properly in line when starting the next row of stitching. Continue with this until all letters are outlined.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

After you’ve completed stitching around your letters you’ll need to anchor your threads since backtacking isn’t a great option when you want a neat and even stitching line. Pull your threads to the back of the shirt, tie them off, then thread the ends through the stitching with a needle. Clip your excess thread tails.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline StudioAppliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Now it’s time to remove your stabilizer from the back of your shirt. It should tear right off, don’t worry too much about tearing your threads.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

That’s it for the appliqué section of the shirt, now assemble the rest of your Linden according to the pattern instructions!

13 Comments Posted in Sewing Tutorials
Journal Entry

Best Laid Plans, Foiled

Best Laid Plans, Foiled | Grainline Studio

I didn’t get a lot of non-pattern development sewing done this winter, it’s not that I didn’t have ideas, plans, or fabric, just a lack of time. I went through some fabric I had earmarked for some fall / winter garments and couldn’t help feeling a little bummed out about all the garments I was going to make that I didn’t get around to.

Best Laid Plans, Foiled | Grainline Studio

It wasn’t limited to sewing either, I started a sweater on January 1st that I’m still knitting. I had hoped this would be a quick knit that I could get some wear out of before spring rolled around but it’s turned into a bit of a beast. Mostly that’s my own fault, I’m knitting it based off the Hemlock Tee and got about 3/4 of the way done when I decided I was knitting too tight of a fabric. Knowing that I won’t wear things that aren’t exactly how I want them I took the whole thing out and started over. Ripping out the first time was a bit of an emotional experience but now that I’ve done it once it’s actually been a lot more fun to knit (and rip, if needed).

The problem with not being able to make anything unrelated to pattern development is that I’ve been feeling a bit uncreative lately. Usually making things for myself is where I experiment and get ideas for new patterns. I’m hoping to institute at least a half day of fun sewing a week to keep myself on track mentally + creatively. Do any of you have a sewing schedule you like to stick to to keep yourself motivated? Also, Me Made May is rapidly approaching so I definitely need to get myself in gear. Are you thinking of participating this year? I’d like to but there’s lots of sewing to be done first…

 

21 Comments Posted in Journal Entry
Sewing Tutorials

Split Hem Linden Tutorial

Sewing Tutorial: Split Hem Linden | Grainline Studio

A few months back I posted this split hem mariner stripe Linden and just realized that I never shared the tutorial on how I split the hem. This is a super easy alteration that adds a nice custom touch to the basic sweatshirt version. I really like it paired with a sweater knit but it would work equally well with regular jersey or sweatshirt fleece.

Sewing Tutorial: Split Hem Linden | Grainline Studio

The only change you’ll need to make to the pattern is that you’ll want to cut the back hem band ribbing longer than the front. I added 2.25″ to mine so that it was visibly a different length than the front.

Sewing Tutorial: Split Hem Linden | Grainline Studio Sewing Tutorial: Split Hem Linden | Grainline Studio

Rather than sew the ends of the ribbing pieces together to make one large circular hem band as the instructions are written, you’re going to fold the right sides of each hem band together and serge (or stitch) the ends of the bands so that you have a front and a back band with both edges closed.

Sewing Tutorial: Split Hem Linden | Grainline Studio

From there you’ll want to turn the hem band right side out and give the ends of each band a good press.

Sewing Tutorial: Split Hem Linden | Grainline Studio

Align the hem bands in the same fashion as you would if they were one continuous band. You’ll want the finished edges of the two bands to meet at the side seams. Once you’ve arranged these bands in place, serge (or stitch) the bands to the bottom of the sweatshirt. If you’re having trouble keeping the two ends in place at the side seam you can always do a bit of basting prior to serging the layers together.

Sewing Tutorial: Split Hem Linden | Grainline Studio

That’s all there is to it, you’ve not got a split hem on your Linden!

Also just a heads up, the paper version of the Linden is currently being re-printed but the PDF version is available as always. If you’d like to be notified of the Print Linden’s return to the shop, you can always sign up for our newsletter over in the sidebar and I’ll fill you in!

5 Comments Posted in Sewing Tutorials
Book Report

Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

It’s been a long time since I’ve done a book review but I wanted to fill you guys in on these two books, Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide and its companion Fabric for Fashion: The Swatch Book by Clive Hallett and Amanda Johnston. I was sent these by Laurence King a bit back and was pleasantly surprised by both. After thinking over them for a bit, I felt that they could really be useful since so many of us now purchase fabric online and swatching isn’t always an option.

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

Let’s start with The Complete Guide: “This book is intended as an easily navigable fabric lexicon that explores the relationship between fashion and textiles and encourages an awareness of fibers and fabrics in a broader fashion context. It is designed to inform the reader of the endless possibilities that fabrics offer to the design process. It is not intended as an exhaustive technical manual, but rather as a tool to inform, inspire, and encourage the creative use of fabrics.”

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

I’d say the description the authors offer is pretty spot on with what I thought about this book. It isn’t an exhaustive manual and they tell you that in the opening book, but honestly, it contains all the information I could ever see myself needing outside of an extremely technical context. The book begins in the first section by explaining some of the processes used to turn fibers into yarn and fabrics, explaining different types of weaves types of weaves, touching on the differences between wovens vs knits, and more. There’s also a nice section on color theory and selection which is a fun read.

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch BookGrainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

Each of the fiber type sections in the book start with a history of the fiber, how it’s processed, and the general characteristics of that fiber in order to give you a bit of background on the fiber or fabric you’re working with before talking about the specific fabrics made from each fiber. This is a nice touch since it helps with a deeper understanding of each fiber and ultimately a more informed fabric selection.

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

From there each fiber is broken down into the many different kinds of fabrics and weaves made from it and explains how each of these is produced and the specific properties they hold. There are plenty of photos illustration both the fibers before they’re made into fabrics as well as the steps they go through during processing.

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

One of my favorite parts of the book is that the types of fabrics made from each fiber are divided into groups that share specific properties that would be instrumental when choosing fabrics. For example, with silk they’ve broken them down into sheer fabrics & fabrics with liquid drape to give you an idea of which fabrics may share similar characteristics. They have also included many current photos of the fabrics sewn up into garments which helps to illustrate how the final garment would act. I thought this was a really nice touch that carries throughout the book.

All in all this book is chocked full of good information that I think would be useful in learning about and choosing fabrics, but it really shines when paired with its companion The Swatch Book since that’s where you’ll actually get to touch the fabrics The Complete Guide is talking about.

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

Now lets talk about my favorite of the two, The Swatch Book: “This book is an easily navigable swatch resource guide that aims to provide an introduction to a basic understanding of fabrics, and to support study into specific fibers and basic weaves. The book considers both natural and man-made fibers. The intention is to encourage students and practitioners to make informed textile choices based upon an understanding and basic knowledge of raw materials, together with the processes that make up a fabric.”

Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

As you can see from the table of contents, these two books really are meant to work together as companions and that’s definitely something they’ve done well. All of the fibers, talked about in The Complete Guide are present in The Swatch Book, which is nice as I know a lot of us are really tactile people.

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

Much like The Complete Guide, The Swatch Book starts out with a bit of info on each type of fiber so that in the case that you don’t own the companion book you’re not flying blind. I like that they really put thought into the fact that many people may end up owning one or the other and made sure that each book stands on its own.

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

By far, hands down, my favorite part about this book is the section Natural, Artificial, and Synthetic Comparisons. This section is exactly what it sounds and is something that I’ve found a lot of authors don’t cover in their books and a lot of people don’t fully understand. Aside from a written comparison they included this amazing page of swatches with the natural version of a fabric next to its synthetic or artificial counterpart. You can really see the difference between silk organza and nylon organza when they’re presented next to each other. A lot of time the synthetic version of a weave is harder to work with than the natural version and I think you can really see how this is true with the side by side comparison included in the book. Honestly I think this section alone makes the book worth purchasing if you’ve ever felt on the fence about this.

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

This is a swatch book so, apart from descriptions of fabrics and comparisons, it contains many swatches of many types of fabric. The swatches are quite large and, unlike the swatch book we used in college, come adhered to the book rather than in a large bag requiring you to sort through and try to figure out what is what.

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

There are a multitude of both natural and synthetic fibers covered here, even some odd ones you wouldn’t expect. There is a a banana swatch in there somewhere as well as some really fun synthetics.

Grainline Studio | Book Report | Fabric for Fashion: The Complete Guide & The Swatch Book

The one thing I don’t like about these books is that while there is a glossary at the back of each book, there is no index. I feel like a good reference book should always have an index for quick page reference. I get that the color coded tabs along the sides of the pages are supposed to act like this but it’s not as quick or accurate as an index would be. That said there is so much good info in these books, particularly my favorite, The Swatch Book, that the absence of an index is not a deal breaker for me.

One thing to note which isn’t a negative, just a heads up, this book is British and as such, many of the fabric names have slightly different spellings and in one or two instances a different name. I don’t foresee this being much of a problem though as it’s usually very easy to know what fabric they’re referencing. Also certain things like fiber will be spelled fibre, again, no big deal.

All in all I recommend this set, Fabrics for Fashion: The Complete Guide and Fabrics for Fashion: The Swatch Book, if you’re looking for a fabric guide this set would more than do the job, but if I had to pick one or the other my favorite would be The Swatch Book. This is due to the size of the swatches as well as the comparison between the natural, artificial, and synthetic fibers as well as the fact that I can see it being of great assistance in ordering fabrics online.

Do you own either of these books? What do you think? Is there a fabric guide you use and love?

11 Comments Posted in Book Report
Journal Entry

We’ve hired…meet Kendra!

Grainline Studio

If you’ve been paying close attention on Instagram you may have noticed Kendra popping up in my posts here and there. She came on to help me with a few things back in July one day a week  but as of February she’s here on a regular basis helping with all aspects of the business. It’s been great to have someone to bounce ideas off of – especially someone as hardworking, talented, and fun as Kendra. She’ll be helping me out on the blog as well as behind the scenes so I wanted to give you guys a chance to get to know her a little bit with a fun interview before she jumps in and starts posting so without further ado, blog readers, meet Kendra!

Jen: You also went to Columbia for Fashion Design, can you tell us a little bit about your sewing background? How did you get interested in sewing and fashion?

Kendra: I was always a bit of an art kid. When I was young, about 5, I loved to dance and that was a big part of life, maybe partly because I loved the tutus. In high school I wanted to be in every art class I could fit into my schedule. When I was about 15 I had already taken most of the art classes, so in the guidance counselor’s office, my advisor asked me if I had even thought about taking sewing classes. My high school had three levels, I took all three and then did an independent study with the sewing instructor. I had totally fallen in love with sewing and fashion design. I knew by my Junior year of high school I wanted to go to Columbia and study Fashion. I really enjoyed my four years there. The coursework was a good mix of technical skills and experimentation. I really loved my pattern making courses and found that it came pretty naturally to me. My brain just kinda worked that way.

Grainline Studio | Meet Kendra

What’s your favorite thing you’ve ever sewn?

In high school I made a pair of shorts, high waisted shorts weren’t really in style at the time but I wanted them anyways. I was taking sewing, so before I even really knew how to properly draft a pattern I went to the local fabric store and I got a pattern for trousers and went to my sewing class, changed the pattern by extending the waistband up and cutting off the leg. It had this cute little placket and I just wore them so much, I wore out the pockets, I wore out the hem, I mended them so many times. They are in my fix it bag now actually.

Grainline Studio | Meet Kendra

The craziest thing you’ve ever sewn?

When I was in college, I made this skirt, where I drafted and sewed up a pencil skirt from muslin and then sewed tulle from the waistband to the hem. Once it was completely covered in tulle, I put it on a dress form and cut the tulle down into the shape I wanted, like I was giving the tulle a haircut! It made a huge mess but was so much fun.

Grainline Studio | Meet Kendra

Are there fabrics or fibers you love to work with? Any you hate?

I love bamboo knits, silk organza, and I’m starting to getting really into knitting so Merino wool is definitely a favorite. I hate fabric that doesn’t press well.

Speaking of fabrics, do you have a dream fabric store find?

Did you ever see that cardigan that Creatures of the Wind did for J. Crew? If I could walk into a fabric store and see a bolt of that it would make my year, plus a killer Linden.

I’m big into the handmade wardrobe, obviously, do you have any specific sewing or handmade wardrobe goals for the next year?

Yes! I told myself that this year I was not going to buy any store-bought clothes, besides shoes…I am going to wear what’s in my current wardrobe and when I have the craving to get myself something new, I’m going to make something instead.

Three words that describe your style:

minimal, muted, balanced.

Grainline Studio | Meet Kendra

What’s your favorite type of garment to sew?

I love making clothing that fits into my daily life, so I would say I like sewing functional garments. It’s the after effect that always gets me, when you keep reaching for the pieces you’ve made because they go with everything and look great on, that’s the best feeling.

Do you have any fiber hobbies besides sewing? Any you’d love to try?

Oh man, like I said, I’m getting really into knitting as of late. I have known how to knit for a while but never pushed myself to move past knitting in a straight line. I’ve made some hats, a pair of slippers, and I’m trying to pick a color for my very first sweater! I would also love to make a quilt sooner than later. I’ve done some embroidery in the past, I’ve been meaning to get back into that as well.

Grainline Studio | Meet Kendra

You’ve been sewing up each pattern over the past few months, do you have a favorite Grainline Studio pattern?

I love the Scout because it’s so cute as is but you can do so much to change it up! The Archer is great too, it’s such a wearable shirt. I’m starting to get hungry for spring so I’m pretty stoked to be making some Alders for warmer weather.

Snacks are big here at Grainline Studio HQ, what are your favorite snacks or bevs?

Can I pick all snacks? I don’t think I’ve ever met a snack I didn’t like. Tacos is the first thing that comes to mind though!

Finally, because it’s the internet, dogs or cats?

Have you seen my dapper little man, Waffles the cat?

Grainline Studio | Meet Kendra

 

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Cascade Sew Along

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Today is the final post in the Cascade Sew-Along, save for some variations I have planned that will pop up in the next few weeks, and we’re going to be sewing the lining into the coat. We will be doing this using the “bagged” method which requires little to no hand stitching. This method seems kind of crazy when you’re first reading through it but it definitely works, and works well! If you feel like you need more guidance, I have a Bagged Jacket Lining tutorial on the blog already, sometimes seeing things written out and photographed more than once can help clear out confusion, so you may want to check that out as well. And with that, lets get started!

http://grainlinestudio.com/2012/01/09/sewing-tutorial-how-to-bag-a-jacket-lining/

Begin by laying the coat shell out face up and the coat lining face down on top of it.

http://grainlinestudio.com/2012/01/09/sewing-tutorial-how-to-bag-a-jacket-lining/

Pin around the edges of the facings only, do not do anything with the lining yet.

http://grainlinestudio.com/2012/01/09/sewing-tutorial-how-to-bag-a-jacket-lining/

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Stitch around the bottom, sides, and neckline of where the coat and facings meet. You may want to turn your coat right side out at this point to double check that everything has been sewn at the right place before we seal up the coat in the next step. If you need to make any adjustments to the stitching, do that now.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Now align the hems of the lining and facing, fold back the seam allowance where the lining and facing meets. The sleeves will be tucked up inside of the body. It will seem like the lining is too short to meet the facing but don’t worry about that, this is what will create the pleat when the coat is turned.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Stitch along the bottom of the hem. Clip your corners and grade the seam allowances along the seams that are sewn to the facing. You do not need to clip or grade anything related to the hem of the lining or hem facing.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Now lay your coat out in a similar fashion. We’ll be attaching the sleeve facing and lining together in these next steps. I promise you’ll be able to get your jacket right side out after this no matter how strange this may seem.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Fold the cuff of the sleeve lining up about 2″.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Insert the folded lining cuff into the sleeve of the coat. You’ll want to make sure that the sleeves aren’t twisted and you have the correct seams matching each other.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

The front and back underarm seams should be matching.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Stitch around the cuff at the standard 1/2″ seam allowance. I’ve found this is the easiest setup to do so at my machine.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Your cuff now looks like this. Repeat the previous steps for the other sleeve.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

After both sleeves are connected at the cuffs, find the hole you left in one of the seams of the sleeve. If you left it open you’re good, if you basted it shut like I did to get a sharp seam press, then open the basting now.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

You will now begin slowly pulling the entire coat out that hole. Work slowly a little bit at a time and your coat will come through just fine. This Pendleton wool is SUPER thick and it worked with no trouble.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

You now have a coat that looks something like this. Pull the sleeves out and head over to your ironing board and begin gently pressing along the outer seam line to give the edges of your jacket a sharp press.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Despite the fact that none of these seams are on a curve, I find it easiest to press on the wool side of the ham because it holds the steam in longer to give a sharper press.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Once your coat is pressed, find the hole you made in the sleeve (we haven’t sewn it up yet) and run your hand through it to grab the side seams of both the lining and shell of the opposite side from the sleeve you have the hole in.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Bring the both out through the sleeve hole so that they’re visible and aligned next to one another.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

We will now create a thread chain between the two points to reduce lining slippage at the underarm. You won’t have to worry about the lining slipping far into or out of the sleeve when putting on and removing your coat. Once you’ve done that side, repeat for the other underarm.

 

The above is a small video illustrating how to make a thread chain. Apologies for the heater going on in the background, I unfortunately don’t have control over that.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Once both of your thread chains are in, you can sew up the hole in the sleeve one of two ways. You could do it by hand, or run over to your machine and stitch close to the edge. I usually use the machine method but either works equally well.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

Once the hole is sewn up your last step is to stitch shut the small opening in the bottom of the jacket. Align and press everything as shown above and hand stitch in place.

Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio Cascade Sew-Along: Lining your Coat | Grainline Studio

And congratulations!! You’ve just sewn the Cascade Duffle Coat!! I’m super proud of you and it really wasn’t that hard at all was it! It’s supposed to warm up a bit around here this weekend so I should be able to get some better photos of the finished coats for next week. I can’t believe it but it’s actually been too cold to wear any of my Cascades recently. I hope you enjoyed the sew along and learned a thing or two. Can’t wait to see your finished coats! If you’re on social media consider tagging me (@grainlinestudio) or using the #CascadeDuffleCoat or #CascadeSewAlong hashtags so I can check out what you’re up to with them!

 

2 Comments Posted in Cascade Sew Along