• Portside Dopp Kit: Cutting

    Holiday Sew-Along Announcement | Grainline Studio

    Today we’re going to talk all about cutting your Portside Dopp Kit. It’s pretty straighforward, you’ll be cutting your main fabric (fabric A, shown as blue above), your contrast fabric (fabric B, shown as white above), your lining, and your fusible interfacing. Since there are so many pieces these cutting maps should help you visualize what you’re cutting and fusing. If you don’t have the Portside Pattern yet, you can grab a copy here!

    Main Fabric / Fabric A

    Portside Dopp Kit: Cutting | Grainline Studio

    In our sample for this sew-along we’re using this camo print twill as our main fabric. We’ve listed the pattern piece numbers, names, and the amount of each you’ll need to cut on each pattern piece above, as well as listed out here:

    • 13 End / cut 2
    • 16 Strap / cut 1
    • 12 Lower Front & Back / cut 2
    • 15 Bottom / cut 1

    Contrast Fabric / Fabric B

    Portside Dopp Kit: Cutting | Grainline Studio

    We’re cutting our contrast, or fabric B, out of this army green twill. Again, you’ll find the pattern pieces needed listed on each of the cut pieces above, as well as in the list below:

    • 11 Upper Back / cut 1
    • 10 Upper Front / cut 1
    • 9 Front & Back / cut 1
    • 14 Top / cut 2

    Lining Fabric

    Portside Dopp Kit: Cutting | Grainline Studio

    For the lining you’ll need to cut the following pieces:

    • 13 End / cut 2
    • 15 Bottom / cut 1
    • 9 Front & Back / cut 2
    • 14 Top / cut 2

    Fusible Interfacing

    Portside Dopp Kit: Cutting | Grainline Studio
    Now to talk about fusible! You’ll need to fuse some, but not all, of the pieces of your Dopp Kit as the pattern is written. If you’re using a fabric that’s too thin, feel free to fuse more pattern pieces, but keep in mind that the fusible will be visible on the inside of the front pocket. I like to fuse the dopp as instructed no matter the weight of fabric because typically they get a lot of use and wear and tear, and it just gives the fabric a bit more strength. The pieces you’ll need to fuse are shown above and also listed below:

    • 13 Ends
    • 11 Upper Back
    • 9 Front & Back
    • 14 Tops
    • 12 Bottom

    When fusing, you’ll want the glue side of the interfacing face down on the wrong side of the cut pieces. Fuse according to the instructions that came with your fusible interfacing. If you find there’s any fusible overhanging the fabric when your done, I like to trim that off so that I have a nice clean edge when sewing, but that’s up to you.

    That’s about all you need to know about cutting your dopp kit, if you have additional questions let us know in the comments below and we’ll help you out as best we can! If you’re participating we’re using the hashtags #grainlineholidaysewalong, #portsidedoppkit, and #portsidetravelset!

    Patterns used in this tutorial

    Portside Dopp Kit: Cutting | Grainline StudioPortside Dopp Kit: Cutting | Grainline Studio
  • Tamarack Society Update: Part 04

    Alright, it’s time for my 4th Tamarack Society Update and I’ve finally got my pieces quilted! It didn’t take that long once I got going, honestly committing to the pattern and chalking it out took the longest. I always forget how quickly quilting goes once you actually get started. Need to apply this to the basted quilt I have upstairs in my house…maybe this winter. Anyway! Here’s where I’m at with my Tamarack!

    Tamarack Society Update: Part 04 | Grainline Studio

    The front is definitely my favorite part of the jacket. Try to ignore the chalk basting grid if you can, I haven’t had a chance to rub it out yet. You can see I followed the quilting pattern of the original Isabel Marant jacket that I started with as my inspiration for this variation. I spaced the front lines out about ½″ from each other, while the diagonals are spaced 1¼″ apart. The diagonals are on the 45° bias from the center front, and pivot up at the side seams, then pivot again at the center back. I love the way it turned out and I can’t wait to wash it up once the jacket is completed so it gets nice and puffy!

    Tamarack Society Update: Part 04 | Grainline Studio

    The lower half of the jacket is horizontal lines following the curve of the hem, from one front to the other. Like the lines on the top, these are also spaced 1¼″ apart.

    Tamarack Society Update: Part 04 | Grainline Studio

    Same for the sleeves, the lines follow the hem and are spaced 1¼″ apart. My goal for this week is to assemble the body and get ready to insert the pockets. I’ll definitely need to do a sample because it’s been a while since I did a double welt, but I think it should go pretty smoothly.

    Tamarack Society Update: Part 04 | Grainline Studio

    I’ve been watching some amazing jackets come to life over in the Tamarack Society Instagram hashtag and it’s so motivating to get my own coat done! If you haven’t checked it out yet, definitely head over there and take a peek, it’s great weekend browsing! I’ll be checking in again soon with hopefully a wearable coat – though likely one still without pockets. Slow and steady right?

    Related Posts

    Tamarack Society Update: Part 04 | Grainline StudioTamarack Society Update: Part 04 | Grainline Studio
  • Stowe Bag Fabric Inspiration

    Stowe Bag Fabric Inspiration | Grainline Studio

    As we mentioned on Monday, the Stowe bag not only makes a great gift, but it’s also a great reusable package for a gift! We chose 4 fabrics that would look just as good everyday as they would under the tree to get your inspiration flowing. You can accent your bag with contrasting binding or use the main fabric for the binding for a one tone look.

    1. Kokka Tentensen Circles
    2. Erin Dollar Double Dash Essex
    3. Robert Kaufman Essex Homespun
    4. Jen Hewett Imagined Landscapes Canvas (this is the fabric we’re using for our bag!)

    There are so many fabric options for the Stowe bag, pretty much any fabric from quilting cotton and linen for a less structured bag to canvas will work well. You might also want to try shopping your fabric stash! The small bag uses just under 1 yard of fabric which makes it a pretty good stash buster. I just checked our fabric cabinet and there are so many options for Stowes in there, I don’t even know why I ordered fabric for this sew-along!

    Patterns used in this tutorial

    Stowe Bag Fabric Inspiration | Grainline StudioStowe Bag Fabric Inspiration | Grainline Studio

  • Stowe Bag Supply List

    Stowe Bag Supply List | Grainline Studio

    Today we’re talking about the supplies you’ll need if you’ll be following along with the Stowe Bag portion of our Holiday Sew-Along series! This project bag is super quick and comes in two sizes, though we’ll be showing the smaller size in this sew-along. Both sizes are great for keeping supplies together, but they also make great reusable wrapping for other gifts. They work up very quickly so if you follow along with us step-by-step you’ll have a Stowe in no time!

    1. Stowe Pattern: You can find the paper pattern here and the PDF version here.

    2. Fabric: We recommend medium weight woven fabrics such as denim, linen, twill, and canvas, however, fabrics over 9oz are not recommended for this pattern. This is because of potential sewing machine difficulty when sewing through a few of the more bulky seams.

    3. Bias Binding or Fabric to Make Binding: You can use pre-made bias binding to finish the edges of your bag, or make your own using matching or contrasting fabric. We’ll show you how to do both during the sew-along.

    4. Thread: I prefer to use standard poly thread for my projects. I like poly because I pre-treat my fabrics and I know that poly won’t shrink when laundered, keeping my seams nice and neat. Try to use high quality thread as it’s kinder to your machine.

    5. Marking Chalk: You’ll need chalk or your favorite removable marking pen to both trace out your pattern as well as trace your pocket lines onto your pattern. This is my favorite chalk tracing pen, but use whatever works for you!

    6. Scissors: I’m not much of a rotary person, but the scissors I find most useful for almost every project I make are my Gingher bent handle shearsembroidery scissors, and thread snips. I couldn’t sew without them.

    7. Rulers: For this project I use all three of the above measuring tools. My trusty measuring tape for laying out my pattern pieces on grain, and the clear plastic rulers for truing my pocket lines.

    8. Pins: Whatever pins you usually use should be just fine for this, just make sure they’re strong enough to go through two layers of your fabric and you’re all set.

    9. Tape Measure: You’ll need a tape measure to take your measurements as well as lay out your pattern pieces for cutting.

    10. Regular Machine Foot: I love my 1/4″ foot (which BERNINA calls the Patchwork Foot) because of the accuracy it provides but I recommend using whatever you’re used to.

    11. Edgestitch Foot: We use this foot when sewing down bias binding to make sure that we have an even stitching line, but it is optional. If your machine has one, it should look something like this.

    12. Bias Tape Maker (optional): If you’re making your own bias tape you might want to consider a bias tape maker. These are super easy to use and come in a variety of widths. You just pull your bias strip through it while ironing the fabric as it comes out the other side. For the Stowe you’ll need your finished binding to be approximately 1/4″ – 3/8″ wide, so keep that in mind when purchasing a bias tape maker. We have this kit which is great and includes every size we could possibly need!

    Patterns used in this tutorial

    Stowe Bag Supply List | Grainline StudioStowe Bag Supply List | Grainline Studio

  • Portside Dopp Kit Fabric Inspiration

    Today we’re going to talk about fabric ideas for your Portside Dopp Kits. There are a ton of options for your Portside Dopp Kit – but to narrow things down and not get overwhelmed by choices, the first thing I do before shopping for fabric is decide if I want my dopp kit to have one outer color, or two. This lets me know if I should be looking for a main fabric that will be easy to match with a contrast or I can just go wild with one color.

    Portside Dopp Kit Fabric Inspiration | Grainline Studio

    I’ve laid out a few bags above to give you an idea of how one or two colors can affect the look of the bag. The fabrics we used for our swatches here are:

    1. Main: Kokka Slices / Contrast: Robert Kauffman Essex
    2. Main: Jen Hewett Stone Path
    3. Main: Rashida Coleman-Hale Shape Up
    4. Main: Waxed Canvas in Buffalo Plaid / Contrast: Robert Kauffman Essex
    5. Main: Waxed Canvas in Woodland Camo
    6. Main & Contrast: Nani Iro Ripple Linen – this fabric is half print, half natural so we’d use the darker part for the lower section and the lighter for the upper.

    As far as linings, the sky’s the limit! One thing to keep in mind though, is that if you use a dark lining it will be a bit harder to find things inside the bag.

    Have you decided on your fabric already? We’re using #6 here for ours, it’s a bit lighter than ideal so that way we can show you how to apply interfacing to add structure to the bag. I’m about to order fabric for another one though, there are too many good fabrics to chose just one!

    Patterns used in this tutorial

    Portside Dopp Kit Fabric Inspiration | Grainline Studio
  • Portside Dopp Kit Supply List

    Portside Dopp Kit Supply List | Grainline Studio

    Today I’m going to discuss the supplies needed if you’d like to sew up a Portside Dopp Kit as part of our Holiday Sew-Along. We don’t start until November 12th but I wanted to post this early enough that you’d have time to gather your supplies before we get started. So with that, let’s talk about what we need to make a Portside Dopp Kit!

    1. Portside Pattern: You can find the paper pattern here and the PDF version here.

    2. Main Fabric: For this pattern we recommend medium to heavy weight fabrics such as canvas, twill, most fabric labeled home dec weight. Lighter fabric can be used but may need to be more heavily interfaced or interlined so keep that in mind. The heavier weight fabric is what helps the bag keep its shape. In our Portside sample, the blue fabric is the main, and the white is the contrast.

    3. Contrast Fabric: You’ll want this fabric to be a similar weight to your main fabric so that your bag doesn’t collapse in spots and holds up uniformly across the two fabrics. As we mentioned above, the white fabric on our Portside samples is the contrast fabric.

    4. Lining Fabric: For the lining fabric we recommend something similar to a quilting cotton or a bit lighter. This is an excellent time to use up those great prints you might have sitting around that don’t quite work for garments!

    I’ll be talking more about fabric ideas on Friday also, so if you need more help, stay tuned for that post.

    5. Fusible Interfacing: You’ll want to choose an interfacing that reflects the properties of the outer fabric you’ve chosen. A mid-weight woven interfacing would be a great choice for this project. Typically we tell people to avoid bonded interfacings but if you want a stiff, structured bag, they would work in this situation.

    6. Zippers: You’ll need 1 – 13″ zipper and 1 – 9″ zipper for your dopp kit. We used metal zippers for our samples that we created from zipper tape, but any regular zipper will work—just make sure you don’t have an invisible zipper!

    7. Leather Scrap (optional): We use the leather scrap to create custom zipper pulls. You can also leave the pulls as is, or purchase one of the many cool zipper pulls that are for sale these days.

    8. Thread: I prefer to use standard poly thread for my projects. I like poly because I pre-treat my fabrics and I know that poly won’t shrink when laundered, keeping my seams nice and neat. Try to use high quality thread as it’s kinder to your machine.

    9. Marking Chalk: You’ll need chalk or your favorite removable marking pen to both trace out your pattern. This is my favorite chalk tracing pen, but use whatever works for you!

    10. Scissors: I’m not much of a rotary person, but the scissors I find most useful for almost every project I make are my Gingher bent handle shearsembroidery scissors, and thread snips. I couldn’t sew without them.

    11. Rulers: For this project I use all three of the above measuring tools. My trusty measuring tape for laying out my pattern pieces on grain, and the clear plastic rulers for various measurements during the project.

    12. Pins: Whatever pins you usually use should be just fine for this, just make sure they’re strong enough to go through two layers of your outer fabrics and you’re all set.

    13. Regular Machine Foot: I love my 1/4″ foot (which BERNINA calls the Patchwork Foot) because of the accuracy it provides but I recommend using whatever you’re used to.

    14. Zipper Foot: This one will come in handy when we sew in the zippers. Again make sure you have a regular zipper foot and not an invisible zipper foot!

    14. Hand Sewing Needles: You’ll need a needle to finish off the lining of the bag, whatever you have laying around should be just fine for this purpose.

    Dopp Kit Yardage

    Since we’re only making the Dopp Kit in this sew-along, you won’t need to order all of the fabric listed on the pattern envelope. If you don’t own the pattern yet, you can always find the yardages in our product listings under the “Sizing and Yardage” tab. If you’re looking for just the Dopp yardage we’ve got you covered here:

    1. Main Fabric: This is the self, or blue fabric, in our sample. You’ll need 3/8 yd to make only the Dopp Kit, and that’s in both 45 & 54″ wide fabric.
    2. Contrast Fabric: This is the contrast, or white fabric, in our sample. You’ll need 1/2 yd to make only the Dopp Kit, and again, that’s both 45 & 54″ wide fabric.
    3. Lining: You’ll need 3/4 yd of fabric, again this is the same for 45 & 54″ wide fabric. If you’d like to make your Dopp Kit one color on the outside, this is also the yardage you’ll need.

    Hope that helps on the fabric front! Please keep in mind that these yardages are only for the Dopp and you won’t be able to squeeze anything else out of it.

    Patterns used in this tutorial

    Portside Dopp Kit Supply List | Grainline StudioPortside Dopp Kit Supply List | Grainline Studio