• Portside Dopp Kit: Fanny Pack Tutorial

    Portside Dopp Kit: Fanny Pack Tutorial

    Today we’re showing you how to easily modify your Portside Dopp Kit from toiletry bag to one of our favorite practical accessories, the Fanny Pack! Don’t let the name deter you. We’ve seen these hands free pouches called belt bags, cross-body slings, waist bags, and a number of other names that distance them from their ‘tacky’ past. These bags are less bulky and cumbersome than backpacks, and they keep your hands free in the way purses sometimes don’t allow. The lightweight nature make them the perfect accessory for numerous occasions. Ready to get started?

    Please note, this tutorial requires the Portside Travel Set pattern. If you’re looking for additional resources you can check out our Portside Travel Set Sew-Along + Related Tutorials by clicking here.

     

    Portside Dopp Kit: Fanny Pack Tutorial

    In addition to the pattern requirements, you’ll also need 1″ (2.54 cm) webbing that is the length of your waist circumference and a 1″ (2.54 cm) buckle.

    Begin by sewing your Dopp Kit as instructed through the attachment of the front panel to the side panels in step 34. You’ll have half of an assembled bag as shown above.

    Portside Dopp Kit: Fanny Pack Tutorial

    Hold your half assembled bag so that is centered on your waist. Measure from the left side of the bag to the center of your back. Cut a piece of webbing that is the same length as that measurement plus 2.5″ (6.35 cm). Thread one end of the cut webbing through the receiving end of your buckle. Pull through about 1.5″ (3.81 cm) of webbing and fold under the raw edge 1/4″ (0.635 cm). Stitch in place using an X pattern. Refer to Step 21 in the Portside Travel Set instructions for a visual reference.

    Portside Dopp Kit: Fanny Pack Tutorial

    Thread the remaining piece of webbing through the opposite buckle piece.

    Portside Dopp Kit: Fanny Pack Tutorial

    Fold the raw end over onto itself at 1.5″ (3.81 cm) and fold the raw edge under 1/4″ (0.635 cm). Stitch in place using a straight stitch or the X pattern.

    Portside Dopp Kit: Fanny Pack Tutorial

    You’re now ready to attach the waist strap to the back panel of the bag. It can help to keep the webbing pieces buckled together to ensure your straps get attached without being twisted.

    Portside Dopp Kit: Fanny Pack Tutorial

    With the right side of your back panel facing up pin your webbing in place on either side of the bag ensuring that the pieces are aligned with one another. My bag has the straps positioned as shown; however, I feel that the top of the bag would sit closer to the body if the webbing had been positioned higher. I recommend positioning the webbing so that the top edge of the webbing is in line with the upper back seam.

    Baste using a 1/4″ (0.635 cm) seam allowance. Then complete the remainder of Step 34 by sewing the back panel to the bag. Be sure to keep the webbing and buckle out of the way. Follow the instructions to complete your Portside Fanny Pack!

    Portside Dopp Kit: Fanny Pack Tutorial
    Portside Dopp Kit: Fanny Pack Tutorial
  • Uniform Modification 03: Cuffed Short Sleeves

    Uniform Modification 03: Cuffed Short Sleeves | Grainline Studio

    Hey all! I’m back with a quick little tutorial on how to give your Uniform Tunic a cute little cuffed sleeve like the one shown above. This will work on both the original pattern as well as if you’ve modified it into a dress. You can also apply these same principles to any sleeve pattern to get a similar look! Let’s dive in.

    Uniform Modification 03: Cuffed Short Sleeves

    To begin you’ll need to figure out how long you want your finished sleeve to be. I want my finished sleeve to be 8 ½” long along the outer edge of my arm so I’m taking that 8 ½” (you’ll use whatever length you want here) and adding 2 ¼” to that. Take that measurement (12″ in my case) and draw a line from the top of the sleeve cap down, parallel to the grain line, then square that marking out from the grain line. Cut and remove the lower portion of the sleeve.

    Uniform Modification 03: Cuffed Short Sleeves

    Draw a line from each underarm corner, down to the new lower edge of the sleeve. These should be parallel with the grain line as well. These lines are your new underarm seams.

    Uniform Modification 03: Cuffed Short Sleeves

    We’re making a 1 ½” cuff here so we’ll need to mark each of the fold lines at this point. Mark a line ¾” up from the lower edge, then another 1 ½” from that line. The final line will also be 1 ½” from the previous line. Your pattern should look like the one above.

    This sleeve is straightforward to sew as well. Sew the underarm seam as you would according to the instructions in the pattern booklet.

    Uniform Modification 03: Cuffed Short Sleeves

    With the sleeve right side up, fold the lower edge up along the top dashed line, 3 ¾”, and press. Then fold and press ¼” over for the hem allowance.

    Uniform Modification 03: Cuffed Short Sleeves

    Fold the hem edge over another ½” and press.

    Uniform Modification 03: Cuffed Short Sleeves

    Fold the hem edge down to meet the lower edge, you’re creating the cuff right now.

    Uniform Modification 03: Cuffed Short Sleeves

    Uniform Modification 03: Cuffed Short Sleeves

    Tuck the new sleeve length edge into the hem edge and pin in place catching only the hem edge and sleeve, not the cuff.

    Uniform Modification 03: Cuffed Short Sleeves

    Fold the sleeve down and out of the way, stitch along the edge of the hem anchoring the hem in place. You may want to do a small bar tack at the underarm of the cuff to keep it from folding down while being worn.

    Uniform Dress | Grainline Studio
    If you’re looking for the tutorial on how we turned the Uniform Tunic into this dress you can find that here: Uniform Dress Variation. If you have any q’s just let us know in the comments below!

    Patterns Used in this Tutorial

  • Summer 2019 Style Inspiration | Aimee

    Summer 2019 Style Inspiration | Aimee | Grainline Studio

    There was a collective, “We’re so happy summer is finally here! … Wait, how are we halfway through the year already?,” moment in the studio this week. I personally look forward to the summer season every year, but once it arrives I often end up feeling intimidated by how quickly it’s passing by. In an attempt to combat my seasonal paralysis, I’m grounding myself in my summer sewing plans and appreciating the season while it’s here!

    Summer 2019 Style Inspiration | Aimee | Grainline Studio

    The slightly oversized Lark Tees I sewed for our previous embroidery inspiration post had me dreaming about a loose fitting mid-calf length Lark Dress. I want something that is relaxed, comfortable, and effortlessly stylish. I think the Lark checks all of those boxes, and I know it sews up quickly. I can imagine wearing this to my neighborhood farmer’s market, lounging around in my yard, and out and about to barbecues.

    Summer 2019 Style Inspiration | Aimee | Grainline Studio

    I try to steer clear of trends, but these sheer organza blouses have been calling my name. I’m really drawn to longer duster versions as well, and I’m planning on using the Archer Button Up to make one. The hardest part will be deciding on length and color. I will likely stick to a neutral tone so that I’ll feel comfortable wearing this long after this fad passes.

    Summer 2019 Style Inspiration | Aimee | Grainline Studio

    I already have a set of Lakeside Pajamas, but have always thought about making a few pairs of the shorts in linen to be worn as day or night wear. I’m thinking about using the Willow Tank to make a few sets of coordinating separates. Lexi also gave me the idea to combine the Willow and Lakeside Shorts into a romper, and I don’t know that I’ll be able to stop thinking about it until I make it. If I do we will definitely be sharing a tutorial!

    Summer 2019 Style Inspiration | Aimee | Grainline Studio

    Ever since Jen made her Uniform Dress I’ve been wanting my own, and think a sleeveless version made up in a leather would be amazing not to mention multi-seasonal. Last on my list, for now, is to use the Felix Dress pattern to make a beach or pool cover up. I might lower the neckline so that the dress cover-up is more similar to the image shown on the right.

    All of these images came from our Summer 2019 Inspiration Pinterest board where you can find additional inspiration. I’ve roped Jen and Lexi into sharing about their summer sewing plans, and they’ll be adding to their sections of the Pinterest board and posting about their summer style soon!

    Do you have summer sewing plans? Let us know in the comments below.

  • Five Basic Embroidery Stitches

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Earlier this week we shared some embroidery inspiration in the form of these two embroidered Lark Tees. Today, we’re circling back and breaking down five basic embroidery stitches with step by step instructions!

    Here are the five stitches you’ll be learning today:

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    1. Back Stitch: This stitch can be used for straight lines, curved lines, and is a great choice for outlining areas.
    2. Stem Stitch: This angled rope like stitch is perfect for flower stems, curved lines, straight lines, and outlining.
    3. Satin Stitch: The Satin Stitch as a filling stitch, use this to shade in solid areas.
    4. French Knot: Used as a decorative stitch, French Knots can be used for flowers, eyes, or other details.
    5. Chain Stitch: Another outline stitch that can be stitched straight or curved.

    Back Stitch

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Begin by bringing the needle up from the underside of the fabric. Take a small stitch backwards from the original stitch point.

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Pull the thread taught. Then bring the needle up from the underside of the fabric above the original stitch point. Be sure to keep the stitch length uniform to the stitch you previously created.

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Again, take a small stitch backwards and then pull the stitch taut. Ensure that the stitches are smooth, uniform, and aren’t causing any pulling on your fabric.

    Repeat the previous two steps. Continue until your Back stitch chain is your desired length.

    Stem Stitch

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Begin by bringing your needle and thread up from the underside of the fabric. Take a stitch forward and begin pulling the thread to the underside of the fabric.

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Before the thread and stitch are completely pulled tight, bring the needle and thread up from the underside of the fabric halfway between the original and subsequent stitch. Pull the thread taut.

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Repeat the previous steps, and continue until your Stem stitch is your desired length.

    Satin Stitch

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Begin by outlining the shape you’re planning to fill with a washable fabric marker or some other marking tool. We recommend testing the marking tool you plan on using on a scrap piece of fabric to ensure it can be removed without leaving any marks behind.

    Then bring your needle and thread up from the underside of the fabric at the edge of the shape you will be filling.

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Stitch to the opposite edge of your shape. Pull your thread taut.

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Repeat the previous steps being sure to keep your stitches very close together. This will create a consistent fill.

    French Knot

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    If you need to make the video larger, hover your mouse over the bottom of the video screen and click on the four arrows pointing in opposite directions to play the video full screen.

    Chain Stitch

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Begin by bringing your needle and thread up from the underside of your fabric. Take a small stitch forward and pull taut.

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Take a stitch ahead of the stitch previously created. Then, loop the needle and thread underneath the previously created stitch.

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Bring the needle and thread back towards the previous stitch and reinsert the needle through the same hole. You’ve created your first chain!

    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio
    Five Basic Embroidery Stitches | Grainline Studio

    Repeat the previous steps to continue your Chain stitch until you achieve your desired length.

    Do you have a favorite embroidery stitch? Let us know below!

  • Two Embroidered Lark Tees

    Two Embroidered Lark Tees | Grainline Studio

    Over the past couple of years we’ve noticed a resurgence of embroidery in fashion, home decor, and art! From floral motifs to political statements, custom embroidery is a great way to experiment with adding eye-catching or humorous design details to garments or other hand sewn items.

    Two Embroidered Lark Tees | Grainline Studio

    We wanted to share some custom embroidery inspiration with you today in the form of these two Lark Tees! The winking eye design was inspired by an image we’ve had bookmarked on Pinterest for awhile, and we were excited to bring it to life. We actually have a Design Details Pinterest Board that’s chock full of design details of all kinds if you’re looking for additional inspiration.

    Two Embroidered Lark Tees | Grainline Studio

    One thing we really love about embroidery projects is how portable they are. It can be challenging during the summer months to balance the brief window of beautiful weather with a desire to complete personal projects. This past week we were able to take our embroidery out of the studio and continue to work while sipping iced tea from our back porch! It was the best of both worlds.

    Two Embroidered Lark Tees | Grainline Studio

    We’ll be publishing an embroidery tutorial later on this week that will teach you a few embroidery stitches and highlight the stitches we used for our Dandelion and Eye Lark Tees. Let us know below what you’re planning to embroider!

    Patterns Used

  • Uniform Tunic Modification 02: Uniform Dress

    Uniform Dress | Grainline StudioToday we’re sharing our next Uniform Tunic Modification post, how to turn your tunic into a dress! We’ve been wanting to do this modification for a while and I finally got the chance to take a break from developing new patterns a few weeks ago and make one to wear to the Knit 1 Brooklyn Tweed Weekend here in Chicago. As soon as I made my Uniform dresses I couldn’t believe I hadn’t made one earlier! Seriously these are my new favorite garments. They’re dressy enough to wear to work, yet comfortable enough to wear…to work? I never realized how odd that saying is until right now.

    Uniform Dress | Grainline Studio

    In addition to the style modification I love how the choice of fabric affects the look of these two dresses. The black Uniform dress was made using a linen/viscose blend from Stonemountain & Daughter Fabrics and it has a slouchy, cool vibe and feels like secret pajamas. On the other hand, the paprika Uniform dress was made with a crisp, lightweight linen from The Fabric Store which holds the shape of the dress well.

    Uniform Dress | Grainline Studio
    Uniform Dress | Grainline Studio

    Altering your Uniform to make a dress is very straightforward as you’ll see below. It’s also a great way to get more mileage out of a pattern you already own!

    Uniform Dress | Grainline Studio

    To begin, trace out the size you need; we’ll be starting with the bodice. I’ll be using the round neck for my versions but you can also use the v-neck, the choice is totally up to you. Next decide how much you want to lengthen your dress. Keep in mind that the Uniform is already has a dropped waist bodice so you may not need to lengthen this part at all. I lengthened mine by 1″ just to keep the dress proportions slightly closer to the proportions of the original tunic.

    If you are going to lengthen your bodice, slash across the lengthen/shorten line marked on the pattern and spread the two pieces the amount you intend to lengthen your pattern. Redraw the side seam and these are your new bodice pattern pieces.

    Uniform Dress | Grainline Studio

    To adjust the skirt, we’re simply going to add onto the hem. I added 8″ to my hem which hits just above my knee. Extend the side seam and center front & back lines down, then measure down from the hem line the amount you’ve chosen to lengthen. That’s all there is to it!

    Uniform Dress | Grainline Studio
    Uniform Dress | Grainline Studio

    After that, cut your pattern pieces and sew according to the instructions in your pattern booklet! This is such an easy modification and takes almost no time at all, but really changes the look and function of the Uniform. Hope you enjoy this modification and if you make one definitely tag us in social media using our IG handle @grainlinestudio and the hashtag #uniformtunic.

    You also might notice that the sleeve on the paprika isn’t standard for the pattern. We’ll be back soon with a tutorial for that as well!

    Patterns Used in this Tutorial