• Printing Layered PDF Patterns

    Our Uniform Tunic PDF pattern is our first layered PDF pattern file, and we plan on continuing to layer our pattern files with our future releases. Layered PDF pattern files include all of the sizes in the same file, but they are stacked on top of one another on separate layers. This allows you to deselect sizes you don’t need and select the size, or sizes, you need before printing. You can save printer ink and have an easier time tracing off or cutting out your size.

    Below, we’re illustrating how to use a layered PDF pattern.

    Print at Home Layered PDF

    1. First make sure you have the most recent version of Adobe Acrobat on your home computer. You can download the free software from the Adobe site here . While there are many different PDF readers, they are not all created alike. Acrobat provides the most consistent printing of any we’ve come across.
    2. After you have downloaded your .PDF files (we recommend downloading to your desktop if possible for easy access) open the print at home pattern file in Acrobat.
    3. Your file should open to the first page of the pattern.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    4. Open the Navigation Pane on the left hand side of the window, by clicking the highlighted area.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    5. If you don’t see the Navigation Pane you can access it by clicking View and then Show/HideLayered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    6. Click Navigation Panes and then select Layers. This will cause the Navigation Pane to open.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    7. Click the Layers icon to display the pattern sizes.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    8. Click on the eye icon to select or deselect sizes. Active layers, those with the eye visible, will be printed.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    9. If you’re in between sizes you can still select the varying sizes you need and blend between them.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    10. Once your sizes have been chosen proceed to printing.
    11. The highlighted areas below show the correct settings for Actual Size printing. You want to make sure Actual Size is checked. You will also see the page fit on your 8.5 x 11 in the US or A4 in the EU in the document window to the right of the image below.Layered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
    12. Before printing the entire pattern, print out just the first page to make sure that your 3 in. x 3 in. square measures correctly — and if it does go ahead and print out the rest!

    Copy Shop Layered PDF Printing Instructions

    1. If you are in the US you can send the full sized copy shop version of the pattern to any service bureau capable of printing 34″ wide. If you are located in the US we recommend using Fed Ex Kinkos and their Large Format Black and White Printer. Another resource is PDFPlotting.com.
    2. A0 files are included for print bureaus outside of the US.
    3. All PDF files should be printed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. Access is restricted to editing programs such as Photoshop, Illustrator, and Indesign and as such, they will not print the files.
    4. You are able to select the size or sizes you need printed in the copyshop file by following the same steps listed above. We’ve provided a few screenshots below to illustrate this. Layered PDF Printing | Grainline StudioLayered PDF Printing | Grainline StudioLayered PDF Printing | Grainline Studio
  • Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Scrunchies and Hair Bows

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio

    Way back in 2012, we wrote about the perpetual horror of fabric scraps and our desire to reuse and recycle mindfully. The comments section on that post contain wonderful contributions in the form of ideas, suggestions, and resources for this common struggle and are worth checking out.

    Currently, we wait until we have a large accumulation of scraps before dropping them off at a garment and textile collection box at H&M. The desire to personally reuse scraps in useful ways has persisted, and we’re running with it! In this periodic scrap busting series we’ll be sharing the occasional tutorial or idea related to using up fabric scraps or small remnants.

    In today’s post we’re showing you how you can use smaller or odd shaped fabric scraps to make Scrunchies and hair tie bows. This quick and easy project is a great scrap buster, and it’s also a great project for newer sewists to build confidence without becoming overwhelmed by multiple pattern pieces and lengthy instructions.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio

    Hair ties are great for pulling and holding back hair, but they can cause damage by pulling, ripping, or breaking hair. First patented in 1987, the Scrunchie, became an alternative to tangle inducing rubber-bands. If you’ve ever looked back at pictures only to notice a scraggly hair tie around your wrist you’ll be happy to hear that these fabric covered bands double as wearable wrist accessories. Lexi was wearing a hair tie bow the day we came up with this tutorial, and we thought it was a great alternative way to use scraps and jazz up a hair tie if Scrunchie’s aren’t your thing.

    To get started grab your fabric scraps or remnants, scissors or rotary cutter, safety pin, thread, seam gauge or ruler, elastic, hair ties, and the Grainline Studio hair bow pattern piece or a drafted pattern piece.

    If you’re a newsletter subscriber you’ll be receiving a link to download a PDF pattern piece for the Hair Tie Bow this week! The piece is fairly simple and easy to draft, but there’s also still time to subscribe. Click here if you’re interested.

    Hair Tie Bow Tutorial

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio

    Begin by printing off our Hair Tie Bow pattern piece or drafting your own. Our shape is about 8 inches (20.32 cm) in length and 3.5 inches (8.89 cm) wide at the widest points. If you want your bows to be fuller increase the width of your pattern piece. Grab the fabric scraps you’re using and cut 2. If you have smaller scraps you can create patchwork bows, but be sure to factor in your seam allowance.

    Sew your pieces together right sides facing at a 1/4 inch (0.635 cm) seam allowance. Leave a small opening between the start and finish of your stitching line.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio

    In order to get crisp points on your hair tie bow ends cut a small triangle out of the seam allowance at the point. Get as close as you can to the seam line without snipping through it. Grade your seam allowance if desired.

    Gently turn your hair tie bow right side out using the opening in the stitching line. Press and then handstitch or edgestitch the opening closed.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio

    Tie your hair tie bow around an existing hair tie or piece of elastic and wear!

    Scrunchie Tutorial

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio

    To create the casing for your Scrunchie elastic or hair tie you’ll need to start with a rectangular piece of fabric. We cut out pieces that were 4 inches (10.16 cm) wide by 15 inches (38.1 cm) long which resulted in a moderately ruffled narrow Scrunchie. If you want more ruffles increase the length of the rectangle. If you want a wider and larger Scrunchie increase the width of the rectangle.

    Cut a piece of 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) wide elastic in a length that comfortable wraps around your wrist. You’ll be overlapping the ends together in a later step so you don’t want this too tight at this point. Set aside.

    Fold the long edges of your fabric in by a 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) and press.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio

    Place the short edges of your fabric rectangle together with the right sides facing. Pin and sew using a 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) seam allowance. Press.

    Fold your fabric loop in half with the wrong sides together so that the folded edges align. Press, pin, and edgestitch. Leave a small opening between the start and finish of your stitching line. Attach a safety pin to the end of the elastic you previously cut and thread it through your fabric casing.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio
    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio

    Slide your fabric down the elastic being sure to keep hold on the tail end of the elastic. Once the elastic has been threaded through the entire casing, remove the safety pin, overlap the ends by 1/2 inch (1.27 cm), and stitch the ends together. To ensure the elastic edges are securely stitched follow the stitching diagram provided.

    Fabric Scrap Busting Series: Hair Bows and Scrunchies | Grainline Studio

    Handstitch or edgestitch the opening closed and repeat to make more!

    As always let us know what you think in the comments below. If you have any ideas you’d like to see included in this series please share them and we’ll try to include them in our series.

  • Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    Today we’re going to teach you how you can modify the pattern pieces of the Hadley Top View B in order to turn it into a wrap top! This modification retains the drapey, fluid style of the original pattern while also providing a slightly closer fit.

    This is a fairly straightforward modification. You will modify one piece of the existing pattern and draft two new pattern pieces.

    Please note that you will need the Hadley Pattern to complete this modification. If this pattern is new to you please note that we have a full sew-along with step by step instructions of the original pattern: Hadley Top Sew Along

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    Hadley Wrap Top Modification

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    Grab the Center Front piece of your Hadley Top (pattern piece 3, View B). Find and cut your size, and trace the pattern piece onto a separate piece of paper. Flip your traced off piece over and lay it on top of your original pattern piece overlapping the center front seam allowances in order to create a full front pattern piece. Trace this onto tracing paper copying markings, dart lines, and notches onto one side.

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio
    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    Determine how low you you want your wrap pieces to overlap across center front. Using the neckline and your overlap point as a reference draw a slightly curved line that extends down and across from the left neckline to the right front side seam. We’re showing two examples of how to draw this line: 1) overlapping across the center front at the original height and 2) overlapping across the center front 3 inches (7.62 cm) lower than the original height.

    The higher your pieces overlap the more likely they are to wrap across the top of your bust instead of around and below. In order to get the perfect fit, style, and drape for your body we recommend making a quick muslin of these front pieces in order to test the fit.

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio
    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    Cut along the dotted line to create your new Hadley Wrap Top front pattern piece. We will be referring to this as piece 1.5 in illustrations. Follow this cutting guide to cut out the remaining pieces you’ll need for this version of the top. You won’t be cutting out the front facings included with the pattern as you will be drafting a separate piece to finish the wrap neckline. We finished the neckline using a pleated rectangle to add more drape and volume, and that’s the finish we’ll be sharing below. If you prefer a different finish feel free finish as desired.

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    To draft the neckline finish and wrap ties you’ll need to take two measurements. Measure along the neckline curve in order to determine the length of the piece you’ll use to finish your neckline (1). Additionally, measure along the wrap side seam, to determine the width of your wrap tie pieces (2). Once you have those measurements you can draw your neckline finishing piece as well as your wrap tie piece.

    Draw a rectangle that is the length of  your neckline measurement (1) + 1 inch and a width of at least 6 inches (15.24 cm). If you want more volume and drape along the neckline make this rectangle wider.  Cut two neckline pieces.

    Draw a rectangle that is the width of your wrap side seam measurement (2) + 1 inch and a length of at least 29 inches (73.66cm). This length should be ample enough for most wrap configurations, but you can certainly cut shorter or longer wrap ties if you prefer. We want to note that we didn’t interface our wrap ties, but do think interfacing would help keep them stable. Cut two wrap ties.

    Once you have everything cut, follow the Hadley Top pattern instructions skipping steps 3 and 4 and proceeding through through Step 9. At this point you should have all of the pieces interfaced, your front necklines staystitched, your darts sewn on the left and right front sides, and your back piece complete and topstitched down.

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    Pin your neckline finishing piece to your left wrap front piece right sides together, and sew using a 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) seam allowance. Press the seam allowance down. Finish the opposite raw edge of the neckline finish as desired.

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    In order to create volume along the neckline you’re going to pleat your neckline finish. You can choose how many pleats you would like and how far apart you would like them depending on the width of your rectangle and the volume and look you’re going for. Originally, we marked out 1 inch (2.54 cm) markings, but ended up pleating at 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) intervals.

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio
    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio
    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    You can press and iron your fabric along your pleat markings in order to help you fold your fabric under. Fold your fabric in along the top of the neckline at the shoulder seam and pin it in place. Repeat these steps, folding in the same direction, on the lower edge. Anchor your pleats in place along the shoulder and side seam by sewing across using a 1/4 inch (0.635 cm) seam allowance.

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio
    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    Finish all edges of your wrap tie piece as desired. Attach the wrap tie to the side seam piece and sew with right sides facing and press your seam allowance open or in towards the front piece.

    Repeat all steps on the right wrap front piece.

    Once you have both front pieces fully prepared, with the right sides facing each other, align and stitch the shoulder seams. Finish seam allowances as desired and press towards the back of the garment.

    With right sides together sew one side seam together and finish seam allowance as desired. Press the seam towards the back of the garment.

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    You need to leave a gap in the other side seam for your waist tie to wrap around and pass through. Before pinning the front and back pieces of this seam together finish each piece separately. Pin the pieces together right sides facing. Towards the bottom of the side seam mark and measure a gap for your waist tie to pass through. The location of this opening and width will be dependent on the width of your finished waist tie piece.

    Starting at the underarm beginning sewing down to your first marking backtacking at the beginning and end. Leave the gap unsewn, and continue sewing below your second marking to the hem of the side seam.

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio
    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    Clip your fabric at both markings as deep as your seam allowance – 1/2 inch (1.27 cm). Press your seam open. Fold the gap seam allowances under by 1/4 inch (0.635 cm), pin in place, and then top stitch along this edge from the right side of your fabric.

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio
    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    Follow the remaining steps in the instruction booklet to finish your modified Hadley. When you attach your back facing you will only be attaching it along the neckline. You’ll need to finish the raw edges of remaining edges, and tack the facing in place at the shoulder seams.

    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio
    Hadley Modification 01: Wrap Top | Grainline Studio

    Let us know what you think of this modification! Will you be making a wrap top? Are there any other pattern modifications you would like to see? Sound off in the comments below.

  • Two Ways to Sew Piping into Your Garments

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    It’s no mystery that attention to detail is necessary when it comes to making clothing; clothes that are well-made and long lasting require care during making. After we’ve sewn a pattern enough times and have the foundational details down pat we get pretty comfortable. Inevitably, this is the moment when most of our mistakes happen! Does this happen to you?

    We’ve found that adding style details to a garment changes things up enough enabling us to maintain focus when we’re working with a familiar pattern. These fun elements add unique touches, and they push our skills. Case in point with the piping striped Linden Sweatshirt shown here! It’s rare to find a ready to wear garment with this type of design detail.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    In today’s sewing tutorial, you’ll learn how to sew in both wavy and circular piping. Piping is traditionally inserted or sewn along the edges of a garment in self or contrast fabric, but it can  be inserted anywhere there is a seam – like the circle shown above.

    Ready? Grab some fabric, piping, a seam gauge, scissors, a zipper foot, and chalk or a marking tool of your preference. You can use a cording foot if you own one. We chose to use a zipper foot in this tutorial as most machines come with this foot.

    Wavy Piping

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    We’re using a washable fabric marker to mark our fabric, but you can use whatever marking tool you prefer. Make sure to test your marking tool on a scrap piece of fabric before you begin to ensure that it will truly wash out. After drawing a wavy line, use a seam gauge to mark out a 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) seam allowance. The top line will be the line you cut along. The bottom line indicates the seam where your piping will be placed.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    Pin your piping so that the raw edge of the piping aligns against the raw edge of your cut piece of fabric. If you’re adding a second line of piping determine how far apart you want your piping to be. Make sure to factor in seam allowance on both sides. Skip ahead if you’re only adding one line of piping.

    Our waves of piping are 2 inches (5.08 cm) apart. Using the other half of the previously cut fabric, measure and mark a 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) seam allowance from the raw edge. From that point measure and mark 2 inches (5.08 cm) or whatever distance you choose. Then, measure and mark another 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) so that you have seam allowance to attach your top piece of piping. Repeat these steps to add as many additional lines of piping as you want.

    Having everything measured and marked on all pieces of fabric prior to sewing is a good way to proactively catch and fix any errors.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    Use a zipper or cording foot to sew on your piping. Sew as close as possible to the encased cording as possible, and you can move your needle position to the far left to enable this.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    After sewing on your first line of piping, press the seam allowance down. You’ll fold it back up when pinning your seams together in the next step, but pressing now will help the seam lie flat after sewing both pieces together. If you’re inserting a second line of piping cut your fabric along the line you’ve drawn. Pin the additional lines of piping along the raw edge.

    You’re ready to sew your two pieces of fabric together! Before doing so, you’re going to add notches so that your curves meet at the correct points when you’re sewing. When you place the pieces of a curved seam right sides together you end up joining a convex and concave curve. As you can see above the pieces don’t align neatly on top of one another in the same way that a straight seam does. Adding the notches will help keep everything aligned.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    To notch your raw seams, unfold your fabric and place wrong sides together. The curves will line up as they are mirror images when the wrong sides of the fabric are facing one another. Snip notches no more than a 1/4 inch (0.63 cm) deep at periodic intervals along both high and low points of your curves.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    Turn your pieces right sides together again, and use the notches you made in the last step to ensure your seams are aligned when pinning. Sew your seams together using your zipper foot and a 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) seam allowance. Remember, you can move your needle to the left to get as close to the piping as possible. Sew slowly following the curve of your fabric being sure to ease when needed.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    Press your seam open, and finish as desired. Sew the second line of piping you previously pinned, and press and finish as desired. Continue adding piping or finish sewing your garment.

    Circular Piping

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    Grab the fabric you plan on inserting your piping into (the piece shown on the left). Trace out the size of the circle, or other squiggly shape, you want to make. Within the circle, measure and mark a 1/2 inch (1.27 cm) seam allowance. This will be the line you cut along. Unless you’re planning on making piped cutouts you’ll need a second piece of fabric to fill in the empty space that will be created when you insert the piping. Use that piece of fabric to draw a circle that is the same size as the original circle or shape drawn (the piece shown on the right).

    Once you have everything drawn, cut out your circles!

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    Pin your piping so that the raw edge of the piping aligns against the raw edge of your cut fabric. Let the tail end of your piping overlap where you started pinning by 1 inch (2.54 cm) and trim.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    Use a seam ripper to carefully unpick the stitching holding the cording in place on the 1 inch (2.54 cm) tail of piping. Once unpicked, spread open the piping and trim the cording by ~ 1 inch (2.54 cm). This will allow you to overlap the beginning and end of your piping smoothly.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    Wrap the empty tail piece around the beginning section of pinning. Fold in the short edge of your tail piece by a 1/4 of an inch (0.63 cm) and pin everything in place.

    Use a zipper or cording foot to carefully sew on your piping. Move your needle to the far left position in order to sew as closely to the piping, without sewing through it, as possible.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    After attaching the piping, press the piping seam down to the wrong side. Flip both piped and insert pieces of fabric over so that the wrong sides of the fabric are facing you.  Place your insert circle on top of piping piece, and carefully pin the pieces together. Pin the right side of your insert circle edge to the right side of the seam allowance you previously pressed inwards.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    Flip everything over, and double check that you’ve correctly pinned your fabric pieces together. You should have right sides facing up on both pieces. Make sure everything is pinned smoothly before sewing.

    Keeping things right side up fold in the edges of your top most piece to expose your pinned seam. Carefully sew the pieces together easing as needed along the way.

    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio
    How To Sew Piping Into Your Garments | Grainline Studio

    Press your seams open, clip if needed, and finish as desired. Repeat the above steps to create additional circles or concentric shapes!

    Let us know what you think about details in the comments. What are other features you like to add to your garments to make them stand out?

  • Four Ways To Style a Denim Moss Skirt

    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio

    Earlier this week, we shared a few pictures of our recently refashioned Moss Skirt and talked a little bit about the process of refashioning. We didn’t put a lot of pictures in that post, because we knew today was going to be picture heavy. Over time, we’ve learned that the patterns we wear the most are those that we can easily pair with other items we already have in our closets. So, we’re showcasing multiple ways of styling this Moss to highlight its wearability.

    Moss Skirt + Archer Button Up

    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio
    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio
    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio
    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio

    When I think of a denim skirt I typically picture a laid back carefree summer outfit. When you pair the skirt with a structured blouse like this billowy Archer Button Up it elevates a normally casual outfit into a dressier look. I’m wearing platform sneakers, but you could easily pair this with heels.

    Moss Skirt + Linden Sweatshirt

    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio
    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio
    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio

    Farmer’s Market season is only a week away in Chicago, and while we’re excited to stroll through the tables of seasonal fruits and vegetables those early morning hours can be chilly. Layering on a Linden Sweatshirt can provide some extra warmth while pulling together a casual outfit.

    Moss Skirt + Hadley Top

    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio
    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio
    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio

    Both views of The Hadley Top look great with this skirt. Your fabric choice will make the difference between a casual or dressy summer outfit.

    Moss Skirt + Short Sleeve Linden

    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio
    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio

    The short-sleeve Linden paired with the Moss makes for a cozy and comfortable outfit that’s great for lounging around in, hanging out with friends, or relaxing in a park. Out of all of the looks shown above this is the one I would reach for the most!

    How do you style your Moss Skirts? Let us know in the comments below!

  • A Refashioned Denim Moss Skirt

    Four Ways of Styling A Denim Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio

    When my grandfather gave me one of his well-worn denim jackets two years ago, I wasn’t quite sure what I wanted to do with it. I stuffed it into my fabric stash, and then I promptly forgot about it. Does this happen to you?

    After seeing a number of unique patchwork denim skirts on Pinterest I was set on sewing one using our Moss Skirt Pattern. The only thing giving me pause was fabric. I didn’t think brand new denim would give me the look I was going for, and I wasn’t keen on distressing denim. That’s when a lightbulb went off and I remembered the jacket!

    Refashioned Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio
    Refashioned Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio

    Once everything was unpicked (two-seam rippers were broken in the process) I was able to cut out my pattern pieces. To sew the skirt fronts, I sewed together three different pieces from the unpicked jacket in a big block, and then I used the pattern piece to cut it to size.

    The skirt turned out better than I could’ve imagined. The jacket was constructed with flat felled seams which preserved the original indigo color of the denim. I was able to carefully put the pieces together in a way that showcased the difference and fading.

    Refashioned Moss Skirt | Grainline Studio

    What are your thoughts on upcycling or refashioning clothing? Refashioning can be a great way to reuse fabric, and it can also be a creative challenge. Here in the studio we have varied opinions. Jen, will take apart a garment to discover how it was made, but she isn’t interested in sewing it back together in a new form. When she has time, Lexi does enjoy taking apart ready to wear clothing. She’ll draft new patterns or sew something new from the original garment. Out of the three of us, I think I enjoy the puzzle of taking an older unworn garment, envisioning something new, and then bringing that vision to life. After painstakingly picking apart the seams of this vintage denim jacket and re-piecing fabric together to cut out the pattern, I’m ready for my next project to be something simpler.

    On Friday, we’ll be sharing a few different ways to style a denim Moss Skirt with some of our other patterns. See you then!

    https://grainlinestudio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/denim_moss_skirt2.jpg