Felix Sew-Along: Gathering Supplies

General Supplies for the Felix Dress | Grainline Studio

Today I’m going to talk a bit about the general supplies you’ll need for your Felix Dress. I had originally planned a fabric inspiration post to go live today but after reviewing the assorted fabric questions in our inboxes this weekend I’ve pulled it for Wednesday in order to add some more specific fabric comparisons that I think you all will find very helpful. So without further ado, here is your general supply list! Specific fabric ideas, recs, and comparisons will follow this post on Wednesday.

1. Felix Pattern: You can purchase the Felix Pattern here. It’s available as a downloadable PDF only but that includes both US and A0 Copy shop files as well as a print at home pattern that fits on both US Letter and A4 paper.

2. Fabric: We’ll be talking all about fabric on Wednesday but you’ll need a lighter weight fabric, think soft fabrics, for the main fabric as well as for the lining. The pattern instructions show you how to line both the bodice and skirt, but in the sew-along I’ll show you how to omit the skirt lining if you’d like. For our sew-along I’ll be using this Atelier Brunette rayon for the self, and lining it with this lightweight viscose batiste.

3.Fusible Interfacing: You’ll want to look for a woven fusible interfacing in approximately the same weight as the fabric you’re using – lightweight! Avoid bonded interfacings as they lack the drape necessary to produce a professional looking garment you’ll want to wear.

4.Thread: I prefer to use standard poly thread for my garments. I like poly because I pre-treat my fabrics and I know that poly won’t shrink when laundered, keeping my seams nice and neat. Try to use high quality thread as it’s kinder to your machine and you’ll get better tension right off the bat.

5. Marking Chalk: You’ll need chalk or your favorite removable marking pen to both trace out your pattern as well as trace your quilting lines onto your pattern. This is my favorite chalk tracing pen, but use whatever works for you!

6. Pins: Whatever pins you usually use will be just fine for this as long as they correspond with your fabric choice. For example if you’re using silk or rayon, you might want to opt for extra-fine satin pinsas they’re a bit slimmer than dressmaker’s pins. If you’re into to cute pins, these Clover Glass Head Pins are our new favorites around the studio. They’re so fine and sharp!

7. Regular Machine Foot: I love my 1/4″ foot (which BERNINA calls the Patchwork Foot) because of the accuracy it provides but I recommend using whatever you’re used to. You may also want an edgestitching foot which looks like this for all the understitching.

8. Scissors: I’m not much of a rotary person, but the scissors I find most useful for almost every project I make are my Gingher bent handle shearsembroidery scissors, and thread snips. I couldn’t sew without them.

9. Rulers: You’ll need a tape measure to take your measurements as well as lay out your pattern pieces for cutting. We also like to have an 18″ gridded ruler handy as well as a seam gauge for pressing up your hems.

10. Ham & Sleeve Roll: I highly recommend having these on hand for your pressing. There’s a bit of tricky pressing on this dress, plus you’ll need to press your sleeve seams, so I highly recommend having these for the project! I have this ham and sleeve roll by Dritz.

So that’s about it for supplies, next up we’ll talk about choosing your fabric and then sizing after that. If you have any supply questions just let us know in the comments below!

Patterns used in this tutorial

4 replies on “Felix Sew-Along: Gathering Supplies

  • whitneydonnelly1

    Looking forward to the tutorial, I always learn something new. I’ve already made this pattern once. I agree that some might be confused by the instructions for lining the bodice, but if you follow along step by step while sewing it all makes sense.(rather than trying to understand simply by reading the instructions). I’m a very experienced sewer but I’ve never seen instructions for lining like these. Very professional! One change I did make was to sew the side seams of the self and the lining separately so that the inside of the dress looked very smooth with no side seams showing.

    Reply
    • Jen

      Yeah, reading it through without sewing is definitely a bit confusing! I had so much fun coming up with the construction for the bodice, this is the sort of thing that makes me love my job. As for the lining, the self and lining side seams should be sewn separately. I apologize if we didn’t get that across properly in the instructions!

      Reply
    • Jen

      A lot of people use it for bags, it’s that interfacing that’s a ton of fibers stuck together with no grain line. Pellon makes a ton of it. Just look for something woven and you’ll be good!

      Reply

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