Quilting your Tamarack

Quilting Tips for the Tamarack Jacket | Grainline Studio

We’re going to have a Tamarack week coming up starting Nov. 14th, with posts about inserting your welt pockets, applying bias binding, setting snaps, and more. In the meantime I wanted to draw your attention to this post we published last fall when the PDF came out where we talk about multiple ways to quilt your Tamarack jacket in case you want to get started before then. If there’s anything else you’d like to see added to our Tamarack week let me know in the comments below and I’ll see what I can do!

View the original Quilting Tips for the Tamarack Jacket post here!

10 replies on “Quilting your Tamarack

  • Beth

    Please post some pics with wool and cotton batting so we can visualize the difference in the finished garment.
    Thanks for all you do.

    Reply
    • Jen

      We’ll have that in our first post about cutting and assembling your quilted layers, but if you need to check before then, our Tamarack post from last year has photos of both a cotton and wool batted jacket.

      Reply
  • Barbara Showell

    I really really love this pattern, and I think it’s going to sell like crazy. I hope maybe so much that you consider drafting it for unisex, or way larger sizes. I’m a 5’11” size 26 and have considered purchasing it anyway and drafting up. It would be a lot of drafting though.

    Reply
    • Jen

      We recommend cutting, then quilting the individual pieces. It’s a bit easier on home machinery – unless you have access to a longarm then quilting multiple yards of fabric will be easy!

      Reply
  • Danielle Bilder

    I’d love to know if you have any thoughts on making it reversible! The bound edges make it a great candidate for that (minus the welt pockets) but the quilting + arm seams make me think maybe it won’t work?

    Reply
    • Jen

      I think to make it reversible you’d have to make 2 different shells, then pop one inside the other and bind them. Likely one or both wouldn’t be quilted because of this. Something like a flat felled seam could work in theory, but doing those on quilted fabric would be tough and probably not very neat.

      Reply
  • Barbara

    It is possible to use Thermidor, a thin batting and quilt both side separately. You don’t have to put a backing on batting to quilt it. If y ou did it that way, you would have both side quilted and the jacket would be reversible. The only tricky part is the front closure.

    Reply

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