Sew and Tell | Kate of Kelbourne Woolens

Cascade Duffle Coat | Grainline Studio

We are so excited to share this lovely version of the Cascade Duffel Coat made by, Kate. She definitely deserves some praise for taking on the challenge! We love her fabric choice and how she mixes it with her cozy woolens. It’s making us look forward to the remaining months of winter.

Cascade Duffle Coat | Grainline Studio  Cascade Duffle Coat | Grainline Studio

Name Kate Gagnon Osborn

Where can we find you online? Kelbourne Woolens

Link to your post about this project Kelbourne Woolens

Which pattern did you use? Cascade Duffel Coat

What type of fabric or other materials did you use?

For the outer fabric, I used wool yardage I bought from Johnson Woolen Mills on one of our trips to Vermont last winter. For the hood lining and zipper panels, I used a mystery charcoal wool that I think I bought on fabric row in Philly last year. For what original purpose, I have no idea.

For the lining, I used Bemberg Ambiance rayon, as recommend by Jen in the sew along. It was my first time working with it, and I am a total convert – it really makes the coat look both professional and exceptionally easy to take on and off; especially when I’m wearing a bunch of layers and/ or wooly sweaters!

Tell us about your project!

I am no stranger to Grainline patterns (the Scout Tee + Alder Shirtdress are two of my “T&T” patterns, and I love the Archer). So while a much “bigger” endeavor, I knew my Cascade would be a great jacket once finished. While not difficult – I found it to be about the same skill level as a Archer. The coat *does* take a lot of time. I paced myself and followed the Sew-along and did one step per “session” as not to get too overwhelmed/frustrated/tired and make a stupid mistake.

The biggest roadblock I faced was the toggles. I couldn’t find anything I liked ready-made, and somehow never made the commitment to try out leather. In the end, I bought grey cording and wooden toggles, and made my own using the main outer fabric and lining to create little pouches that I stuffed the cording into. I tried about a bajillion different ways to machine sew them on, using the machine, but they never came out exactly as perfect as I envisioned. So I ended up sewing them all on by hand. Time consuming, but well worth it in the end!

As mentioned previously, the only other small change I made was to line the hood with a charcoal wool I had in my stash, instead of the rayon, and use the same wool for the zipper panels. I regret not adding a tiny bit of flair in the form of a pop of color somewhere (maybe the zipper tape?) but anyone who knows me knows… I go all grey all day, so the coat fits my personality and my style to a T.

I actually bought two coats worth of wool at Johnson Woolen Mills, and am anxiously anticipating making a shorter version with the collar out of the other fabric I have!

Cascade Duffle Coat | Grainline Studio

19 replies on “Sew and Tell | Kate of Kelbourne Woolens

  • PsychicKathleen

    Beautiful coat! Being a Canadian I always have my eyes on great winter coats – warm and comfortable certainly but unique is compelling as well. Great job!

    Reply
  • Maike

    Beautiful coat, the fabric is so pretty!

    I do have a question though. I wanted to make the Cascade too. But then I saw that the right front stands away from the body at the bottom in many versions( in the above version as well, as you can see in the first photo . Is that a pattern drafting mistake or just normal and I have to fix it with a snap closure or something like that?

    That’s the only thing that’s keeping me from buying the pattern.

    Reply
    • Jen

      It’s just normal, mostly from sitting and moving around. A few options you have are to run the zipper all the way to the bottom or add a snap, but that could make it a bit hard to walk, or to topstitch through all the outer layers which will anchor the interior seam allowances and help prevent it from flipping with wear. Unfortunately we move around and bend our clothes out of shape, things would be so much neater if we just stood still!

      Reply
    • MJ

      Maike, I believe it is the wind catching the right front. Look at the photos again and see what I mean. The only other reason would be that seams or sewing along the edges of the coat were done in opposite directions. It is best to sew both sides from bottom to top. Bottom up so that the fabric isn’t stretched down causing the corners to sag.

      Hope this is helpful to you. Now go buy the pattern!

      MJ, the SKEINdinavian

      Reply
      • Maike

        Might be. But I’ve seen it on a lot of photos, so I wanted to ask.

        Thank you for the advice!

        I’ll probably will, when I finally find the time again to sew. It’s been a bit hectic here lately. 😉

        Reply
        • MJ, the SKEINdinavian

          Jen brought up a point that I take for granted; sewing down the seam allowances. I normally sew them down as inconspicuously as possible but have been known to top stitch in the ditch… if there is one.

          Also, pressing, NOT IRONING, but just placing the iron on the opened seam helps to smooth seams nicely. When sewing down the seam allowances, fold the pressed seam together again. Then pull it a TINY bit towards the wrong side. The idea is to BARELY turn the edge inwards. This helps keep the edge from flipping outward. After pulling the seam allowance that TINY bit, pin it down, and continue in this fashion for the length of the seam allowance. Then baste and pull the pins. If you have made an even edge, then sew it down permanently.

          As for the flipping coat bottom, go back and look carefully at the photos again. You will notice that the models hair and the coat bottom are both being blown in the same direction. It is not a design flaw.

          Now go buy that pattern. Hectic will pass and so might the patterns availability.

          MJ, the SKEINdinavian

          Reply
          • Maike

            Thank you for the advice. That would have been my first try on the muslin as well, to see if that makes it better.

            As for the flipping coat bottom: I didn’t mean to be rude with my question, you seem to have misunderstood me there. I wouldn’t have asked it if I would have only seen it in one photo of one person. I looked at several photos on the pinterest board from different sewists(https://www.pinterest.com/grainlinestudio/cascade/) and it’s happening in all of the longer coats, so I just wanted to know what the reason for that might be. Again I didn’t intend to be rude or question Jen’s competence as the other patterns I own of her are all wonderful.

            Thanks.

        • MJ, the SKEINdinavian

          Maike, you are correct. I did misunderstand. I had not seen the Pinterest page. Thank you for sharing that. I now SEE what you are talking about.

          My guess now would be the bulkiness of the fabric, which isn’t that apparent in Jen’s webpage photos. Compound that by the band along the edge, which creates enough weakness where it is seamed to the body of the coat, particularly in heavier fabrics, that causes the edge to flip out. More than likely the hem of the coat is wide enough that the band is necessary in order to arrive at the design hem width.

          My only suggestion at this point would be to ascertain that my last statement is true. If that is the case, my next suggestion is to put a semi-stiff interlining in the band, cut wide enough to go well into the body of the coat. When sewing the band to the coat, make certain to drop the feedbed of your machine and set your stitch length as long as it will go. The idea is to NOT compress the seam and create that weak line discussed earlier. Press all the seams toward the body of the coat. Trim the body’s seam allowance and the band’s seam allowance next to it… and that one closer to the seam itself. If you want to ensure the band not trying to flip, pull the untrimmed band seam allowance a TINY bit, as explained before, and hand sew it to the body of the coat… just skimming the surface of the fabric. You do not want to have you stitches show on the face of the fabric.

          IF the fabric is wide enough to accomplish the width of the body AND the band, then forgo the band altogether and the problem will solve itself. Easier than falling down stairs!

          I hope your hectic days are short in duration so you can get back to your sewing machine. A life without creativity is woeful!

          MJ, the SKEINdinavian

          Reply
          • Maike

            Thank you so much for the tipps, I will try that!

            Oh no problem there, I’m a freelance illustrator so my life is already pretty creative. 😉 I just find sewing fascinating, so I try to understand all the techniques and sew very slow to have a well made garment.

            Thanks again,
            Maike

        • MJ, the SKEINdinavian

          Maike, you are very welcome. I hope my tips all work well for you. If you have trouble, I am here with decades of sewing experience. It is good to hear that you sew slowly. That is one sure way of creating a thing of true beauty.

          Freelance illustrator, huh? GOOD FOR YOU! My mother told me I could not make money with my art. Yet, she brought me much work… and yes, I did find work in the arts even way back before computing became mainstream. I can only imagine what could have come to me had I continued to pursue my art as a career. I would love to see your work!

          Have a great day, Maike.

          MJ, the SKEINdinavian

          Reply
          • Maike

            I think every parent says that at first, but now they are okay with it.

            You can find my art blog under maikeplenzke.tumblr.com, my sewing I post under sewandillustrate.blogspot.com but I sew so rarely, that I’m not sure I should keep the blog. 😉

            Have a good day as well!

        • MJ, the SKEINdinavian

          Thank you for sharing your websites with me, Maike. I say, keep the sewing blog (you may begin sewing again), and definitely KEEP PAINTING! Love your work and your great sense of color. Good luck with the Comic Book.

          Hope you are having a PEACEFUL weekend!

          MJ, the SKEINdinavian

          Reply
  • Kate

    Thanks so much for the feature! It really is such a great coat and pattern. (And thanks for your kind comments, prolificprojectstarter and PsychicKathleen!)

    Reply
  • Nancy Glover

    I believe the one side sticks out because it’s not sewn with the grain? I have the same problem and that’s what I was told, maybe by Cynthia Guffey?

    Reply
  • Nancy Glover

    With a woven fabric you sew in the direction that the fibers tend to ravel, which doesn’t necessarily mean up or down, but looking at the edges of the fabric to see which way to sew towards the fibers coming off the textile.

    Reply

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