Flat Bias Faced Necklines

Flat Bias Facings | Grainline Studio

As summer enters it’s hot and humid phase I’ve noticed a lot of people searching the blog for our most popular tutorial, Getting Flat Bias Necklines. This tutorial works well for anything you’re using a bias facing on, not just necklines. So if you’re in a tank and tee frenzy like we are over here, this tutorial is a must see!

12 replies on “Flat Bias Faced Necklines

  • Laura Lee

    Oh, this post! Almost three years ago I had not yet seen any sewing blogs or tutorials and was trying to “go it alone” while I made my first top. I stopped for a while and then searched for ‘bias neck binding’ and found this. I printed it out, studied it carefully and eventually made a beautiful top. This was the beginning of a very rewarding hobby for me and I credit your amazing photography and easy to understand instructions. Thank you for being an inspiration!

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  • Mai T

    Hi Jen!

    I was looking for necklines sewing tutorials for hours on Internet and then, I found your tutorial. I find this post so helpful to me.

    I’m surprised that this tutorial has been posted 3 years ago, but it is still new to me that I can learn and practice with it as summer has come.

    Thank you!

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  • Stephanie

    Ha! I just used this method last night! Your original tutorial for this finish is what brought me to your blog in the first place a few years ago. I know it by heart now, thanks so much for posting it!

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  • Mary Pomeroy

    I have a question about the bias strip you cut yourself. The directions say to cut it 1/8 inch less than the neck measurement and then sew it together. Is the 1/8″ less than the bias strip without the seam, or after the seam has been sewn? Was the seam 5/8″?

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    • Jen

      It’s before the seam allowance. The seam allowance I use at the neckline is 1/4″ since the smaller the seam allowance, the more accurate the sewing.

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  • Nina

    Thanks for the reminder – I’m looking forward to trying this out on a Tiny Pocket Tank. One confusion: the tutorial says your get a 1/4″ facing from a 1″ strip, but I can’t work out how. It looks like you have a 1/4″ seam allowance either side, which would leave 1/2″ finished width, wouldn’t it? Or do you trim off 1/4″ somewhere? I have some 1/2″ single-fold bias tape I made and I’m wondering if I can use it…

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    • Laura Lee

      I am going to jump in and see if I have learned ANYTHING…I will be corrected if I am wrong and am curious to see if I have studied this enough!
      You have 1/4″ Seam Allowance on the first side, then the actual 1/4″ binding on that side (folded over the S. A. Then on the second side you have the same, 1/4″ binding sitting over the 1/4″ S. A.

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      • Nina

        That’s how it works with a bound edge, but this is a facing – all of the bias strip is inside the garment. Looking at the photos again, Jen seems to fold the second edge under to meet the first seam line, which would give a 3/8″ finished facing, I think!?!

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    • Jen

      So here’s how it works. You cut a 1″ strip, then since it’s a bit shorter than the length of the neckline it stretches slightly and becomes a bit narrower so after the two 1/4″ seam allowances (the one you attach and the one you fold under) you’re at around 3/8″ in width. This is usually made slightly narrower due to the fact that we’re all human and things slide around a tiny bit when sewing which usually eats up another 1/16″. Add to that the fact that when you understitch and press, you’ll be pressing under slightly more of the shirt than just the the 1/4″ seam allowance so that the seam line falls to the underside of the garment. That eats up the extra 1/16″ if you fold the raw edge of the seam allowance under to meet the folded edge. You’re now at 1/4″ binding!

      If you use a 1/2″ wide bias strip to start you’ll need to do less than a 1/4″ seam allowance because the two seam allowances will use up the entire width of the tape. You can try starting with a 3/4″ wide piece but it’s likely going to end up being much narrower than 1/4″ by the time you’re done with all the steps. Hope that helps!

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      • Nina

        Aha, OK! Thanks for the very detailed explanation, Jen! My 1/2″ single fold bias tape is made from a 1″ strip, with 1/4″ already folded and pressed on either side – what a shop would call 1/2″ single fold binding.

        Reply

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