Three Hats- Love, Like, Hate

Grainline Studio | Wool and the Gang Zion Lion Hat

Well hey there, it’s been a while! I’m trying to ease back into this blogging thing – it really does become hard to start back up once you’ve gone a while without writing anything. So to get rolling, today I have three previously unblogged hats for you and for one reason or another, I’m not totally happy with any of them, though this first one is pretty close to perfect. It’s easy to blog things you love but I thought this might be a good record of what I like and don’t like in a hat so I can keep tabs going forward, plus I’m sure a lot of us have been in a similar situation. Lets start with my favorite of the three, Zion Lion by Wool and the Gang [Ravelry Link].

Grainline Studio | Wool and the Gang Zion Lion Hat

Honestly I’m 99% in love with this hat, and I should add that I was sent this hat kit, with needles, free from Wool and the Gang to test out. The knitting process went smoothly and quickly as one would expect with a gigantic yarn and needle, it’s knit flat and seamed up the back. I thought the seam in the back would bother me but it doesn’t thankfully. I love the shape and the warmth; this hat kept me going all winter long here in Chicago.

Grainline Studio | Wool and the Gang Zion Lion Hat

Now for the part I don’t totally love. It’s kind of hard to tell in this photo but the bulky single ply yarn got super gnarly over the course of the past 6 months, as one would expect with a yarn like this. It was still a bummer though and while I keep wearing it anyway, I can’t help but feel a bit sad for my fuzz town hat. At least it was well loved!

Grainline Studio | Simple Pleasures Hat

Now onto the next hat! This pattern is the ever popular Purl Soho Simple Pleasures hat [Ravelry Link] knit up in their own yarn, Worsted Twist, of which I unfortunately do not remember the colorway. I absolutely loved working with this yarn, it has a beautiful sheen and feels great on the needles. I also love the color, it’s kind of a greenish stone grey in real life that is very hard to photograph.

Grainline Studio | Simple Pleasures Hat

I had knit one of these hats a while back using some forest green KnitPicks yarn and wore it till it died so I figured this would be the same, but this version turned out gigantic, and I don’t just mean it’s too tall, which it is. I should have stopped knitting for the crown decreases much earlier than instructed, but besides that the hat is just way too big. I think the yarn I previously used may have been a bit thinner than this and I just thought “Oh hey, they’re both worsted, it’s cool!” and went on my merry way.

Grainline Studio | Simple Pleasures Hat

We’re going up north this weekend so I’ll probably leave this hat up there for the next time we’re at the cabin during the winter months. Or maybe I’ll unravel the hat and use the yarn for something else. One or the other, but either way I don’t think it’s a loss and I had a great time knitting with this yarn.

Grainline Studio | Purl Soho Boyfriend Hat

This last hat I 100% hate and is probably the most annoying thing I’ve ever knit. May I present to you the Purl Soho Boyfriend Hat [Ravelry Link]. I know like 500,000 of us have knit this thing and if you have, please let me know how you feel about yours in the comments below! I don’t know where I went wrong on this thing but it was a straight up disaster.

Grainline Studio | Purl Soho Boyfriend Hat

You might be able to tell from how far back it is on my head in these photos but this hat turned out gigantic! I used a similar weight yarn as the Line Weight called for in the pattern, got gauge, then went down a needle size because of the fact that my yarn contains 70% Alpaca and that can tend to stretch. Even with this precaution the hat turned out about 2″ larger than it should have based on the Purl measurements despite the fact that my gauge was smaller than called for. At first I chalked it up to me being crazy but Kendra knit two for Christmas presents and had the exact same problem.

Grainline Studio | Purl Soho Boyfriend Hat

The other bummer about this hat is the cabled cast on they recommended in the photo resulted in this majorly wavy cast on edge. I should have known, you can see it waving in the Purl photos, but I just figured they knew better and it would work itself out. Guys, listen to your gut! Steph mentioned she used the long tail method and her cast on edge looked great so I think that’s probably the best bet if I ever knit this thing again. Also it took forever to knit all this 1×1 rib! I tried to give the hat to my boyfriend but Jon also hated it and it’s gathering dust somewhere in the house until one of us finally throws it out. Ah well, knit and learn!

I’ve got a few hats in my Ravelry queue that I want to knit up that I think have a lot of potential, and I’m almost finished with the sweater I started back in January after ripping the entire thing out once and starting over. Have you guys knit anything you hated? Did you rip back or just try to go with it?

55 replies on “Three Hats- Love, Like, Hate

  • Ainsley

    I had the exact same experience with the Purlbee Boyfriend Hat! Knit in secret for a gift, and it turned out miserably huge. Most bummer/anti-climatic secret knitting project ever.

    Reply
      • Aimee

        I also had the same experience. It was the first hat I ever knit so I chalked it up to that – but the medium size ended up more like a large 🙁 I still wear it though.

        Reply
          • raptinthought

            I cast on for the men’s medium, but could immediately tell that is was waaaaay too large. So I went with the women’s small, and this fits my boyfriend’s head perfectly. I think the pattern sizes are just way off. Also, I had to block it on a balloon to open up the hat at top. I also didn’t use the pattern’s crown decreases—some people (on Rav) didn’t like the abruptness of those so I chose a decrease pattern that took 1.5″ to complete.

  • Regina Roza

    You MUST check out ‘oneflewover’ blog for the Felicity II hat….it’s so weird, I read your post, deleted it (which I never do) i don’t knit 🙁 so i fished the post outta my deleted bin and here i sit writing this to you…THIS HAT IS SOOOO CUTE I’M GONNA TAKE A KNITTING CLASS….MY WHOLE FAMILY KNITS BUT I SEW!!

    Reply
  • Cindy

    Have knit a ton of hats and whole bunch of everything else I am going to say and suggest a dirty word that a majority of knitters hate to do and I was among them until I finally put my big girl panties on and did the dreaded swatch.

    After messing up very similar experience to yours and after knitting a bunch of gauge swatches and seeing how the yarn knitted up I knew whether a yarn would work for a project. Doing that one little swatch instead of knitting an entire project saves a lot of time, frustration and frogging.

    Also everyone knits different – tight, loose, in the middle of these etc. and that also determines whether a yarn will work for the project you have in mind.

    A knitted gauge swatch is like get a sample of fabric – seeing how it looks, feels, sews etc. and it will tell you if it is what you want to use for your sewing project and have success and what won’t.

    Also when starting any project where there is ribbing it is always good to go down at least 1 or even 2 needles sizes because ribbing needs to be a bit tighter and does stretch quite a bit.

    Knit a bunch of swatches to see how you knit if you get the gauge of patterns and then you can make adjustments going up or down a needle size, change yarn etc. until you get what you want – in knitting we call our knitting projects for say a sweater fabric too and also by doing a gauge swatch you will know if it is the right fabric for what you want.

    Sorry to write so much but boy do I know, been there done that and finally am a firm believer in swatches.

    Reply
    • Jen

      Haha, no problem, write as much as you like! When I started knitting back in 2001 I never knit swatches since I’m a pretty average, run of the mill knitter tension wise, but probably about 5 years in I made a sweater that turned out an odd size and I’ve been a swatcher ever since! I actually did swatch for the first and third hat since I’d never knit them before and despite swatching the third turned out totally off, which seems to be a problem with the pattern measurements based on the comments I’m getting here. Ah well, I’m not losing any sleep over any of these hats so it’s all good.

      Reply
  • Linda

    Yep! Not with a hat, but the ever popular miette cardigan – I knit it once and it was too small, frogged it, and now it’s too big. Back to simple knitting projects for me!

    Reply
  • Jenifer Farrell

    I have a couple of recommendations, having knit many many hats …

    I knit a Rikke recently in malabrigo worsted and I will make it many many times now – it is an awesome hat! And if you’re into easy (garter stitch) and slouchy, even better. (Rav link to my hat : http://www.ravelry.com/projects/thecalicolover/rikke-hat ) If you do this I recommend knitting flat and seaming — the garter seams up far nicer than if you were to knit in the round and change k/p on every row, plus it makes for straight knitting. I knit this hat during meetings.

    My other two hats I love and wear all the time are a “from norway with love” hat (rav link here http://www.ravelry.com/projects/thecalicolover/from-norway-with-love—hat-2 ) …

    And also a Rosebud hat — it’s a perfect fit !! (rav link here http://www.ravelry.com/projects/thecalicolover/rosebud )

    Sorry for the over info but just thought I’d share! Good luck with it all.

    Reply
    • Jen

      No need to be sorry, I love recommendations & those are super cute! I really feel like you can never have too many hats, they’re the perfect project for between larger ones, and the best during the summer so you’re all set for fall!

      Reply
  • Kelly

    That boyfriend hat- arg, mine was super frustrating too!! I knitted a swatch and got gauge with a tiny needle, I can’t remember what size but like a 1 or 2…and I still ripped it out and started over like 5 times to try and get the size right. I ended up with waaaayyyy less stitches than the pattern called for. I think I actually used the number they recommended for a child size hat in the comments? And I have a huge head. And then it took forever. That being said, I really love that hat and wore it all winter long, and it still looks great so yeah, worth it (maybe).

    Reply
    • Jen

      Yeah I knit the small and it fit on Jon’s big head 😉 seriously that thing was annoying! You’re so good though ripping it out, about halfway through I just thought ‘oh I’ll just give it to Jon’ but blah on that! Sallie said she had problems with another one of their hats also so maybe it’s a PurlBee knitting thing. I’ve noticed that their cowls are definitely their most popular projects, maybe cause no fitting involved? Glad you got yours going in the end, I can see it being SO CUTE if it’s done right!

      Reply
  • Bella

    I love the first two but can see why you aren’t keen on the 3rd one. What happens if you fold it up at the bottom? I like that you tried to give it to Jon, that’s totally the sort of thing I would do.
    I’ve knitted several things that I have hated. They are all sweaters! Ugh. Maybe I should take that as a memo to stop knitting them…l

    Reply
    • Jen

      Folding it up at the bottom is super weird b/c of the wavy cast on edge, Jon was doing that for a while until it started to resemble a bucket hat (because it was even too big for him) and at that point we stuffed it in a dark corner somewhere. Ha! Definitely don’t stop knitting though! I think they key to choosing knitting projects is to really know what silhouettes work on your body and go with things that fit like that.

      Reply
  • B

    Had a similar experience with the boyfriend hat, but I am super paranoid about long, elfish hats so thankfully pre-empted it and cut back on a few rows. On the plus side, I think they all look great on you.

    Reply
  • Wendy

    I’m not a hat person at all but do wish I could wear that first one! After knitting a few cardigans that I didn’t wear because I didn’t love them my rule is – not loving it while knitting it, rip it out! Knitting and sewing time is too short to spend on making things you know will likely end up not being worn.

    Reply
    • Jen

      I also feel like I’m not really a hat person but I just roll with it to avoid cold head in the fall / winter / spring. I definitely agree with your rip it out motto, it feels kind of terrible when you’re about to do it but it’s really very freeing!

      Reply
  • Marissa

    I made the boyfriend hat.. It took FOREVER and I worked on it religiously. I gave it to my boyfriend and he says he loves it (of course). It did knit up big but fortunately he’s kind of a giant. Sometimes I wear it and it’s huge but the fabric feels so nice and warm. I might consider making a small for myself.

    Reply
    • Jen

      Hahaha well sounds like the extra size worked out great for you! Seriously I can’t believe how long that hat took, I think I knit my Bellows sweater faster than that thing! I’ve also thought about going down in size but actually I think I’m going to try this pattern first and see if I like that better. It seems a little better thought out than the Purl pattern, but with the same general shape and feel. http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/roku I’ll let you know how it goes when I get around to it

      Reply
  • Amelia

    your hair has grown so long! it has curls!

    anyway, the hats. i’d frog the second one and reknit it, casting on less sts and starting the crown decreases sooner. you love the hat, you love the yarn, make one that fits.

    x Amelia

    Reply
    • Jen

      Haha, it’s so long I’m starting to feel like a Hobbit! Have an appointment next week to chop it all off, cannot wait

      So funny I actually never thought about frogging it and re-knitting the same hat, just saving the yarn for something else. HA! Thanks for the input on that, it’s now my new plan

      Reply
  • Maria

    I’ve knit dozens and dozens of hats over the years and always wonder how something so seemingly simple can end up disappointing you in so many new ways…. The perfect hat is an elusive one. My current favorite is Jenny gordy’s oljett – the right amount of slouch, detail, and mindlessness, plus you can customize with what color or colors you’re working together.

    And so we knit on… Or perhaps – do I dare to knit a hat?

    Reply
    • Jen

      I know, it definitely seems like it’s a hat, it should be easy! I wonder if it’s because they’re so close to our face, and frame them, so we notice things we don’t like more than say a sweater. I made one of Jenny’s hats, I can’t remember which one, but it was stolen by Jon and never photographed. I should check that one out, thanks for the rec!

      Reply
  • sallie

    My sister knitted the boyfriend hat for a Christmas present and it, too, ended up Gigantasaurus Rex. I knit Purl Bee’s traveling cable hat this winter and it ended up kinda small. All in all, I haven’t been too impressed with the sizing of Purl Bee’s patterns! But I think you look pretty cute in all three hats – you wear hats really well! I really do love the Simple Pleasures hat, and might give it a try one of these days if I can get over my mistrust of P.B’s patterns…

    Reply
    • Jen

      Yeah I feel you on that, I know the point of them is to sell yarn (or fabric) but it’d be nice if there was a little more checking going into things? If you look at the simple pleasures post they actually re-did the entire pattern (okay they just lowered the needle size) because so many people reported back that it was turning out HUGE. This is why generally I like paying for patterns from a handful of designers I trust. I’m still baffled about why knitting patterns are so cheap though, even Brooklyn Tweed! Now I’m rambling though…

      Reply
  • jaimn

    Thank you for sharing these three hats. How long did each take? You said the 1×1 took forever – I’m a beginner, and I’ve started a beanie multiple times with three different yarns and two sets of needles (first set broke:( ) It is taking me forever to knit this hat (a 2×2), and I’m spending about 1 hour at a time on it, about 4 times a week. Now that I’ve got a good needle set and yarn, I am hoping to get this done – before next winter, but it’s taking for.ev.er!! 🙁 Any suggestions? I dare not start a sweater, and we won’t get into the socks that I started (in a real class!).

    Cindy, thanks so much for your comment. Not too long – just right for beginners like me!

    Thanks ladies!! 🙂

    Reply
    • Jen

      I don’t really remember exactly how long it took, I usually knit while doing something else at the same time, movie, editing stuff, etc. According to Ravelry it took me 2 weeks from cast on to cast off, I’d guess I probably knit a few nights a week for an hour or so. I don’t know if that helps or not? I like to keep a larger and smaller, more mobile, project going at the same time so if you’re feeling frustrated with one or need to travel and want to knit, you have something else to go between. Other than that, just stick with it, practice is really what knitting’s all about (sewing too for that matter).

      Reply
  • heather

    Hey- just thought I’d let you know that I like posts like this. Sometimes I feel like I’m the only one who has craft fails. Your hats all look great, but I understand that you’re going for just right- not just alright. Thanks for sharing. It helps. 🙂

    Reply
    • Jen

      Glad to help, and always keep in mind, no matter what people are sharing on their blog or social media, it’s only part of the truth. Everyone messes up projects and you’re totally not alone! I recently was talking to a friend while sewing a dress and made two left fronts – nobody is perfect, especially not me! <3

      Reply
  • Cara

    The perfect hat is definitely elusive. By now I know for myself to go down at least one needle size, sometimes two for the ribbing (and yes I am often lazy about knitting swatches for hats) but getting gauge on hat usually still means it will be too big for me and my pea-sized head anyway.

    I’ve knit two out of the three you’ve done here, but with different results. I did swatch for that boyfriend hat since I knew it was going to be a lot of knitting for a simple hat, and mine is actually quite a good fit in the end but I used a stiffer sock yarn so I find it quite rigid and don’t wear it much (I likely could have gone even tighter on the ribbing since I hate the feeling of a hat almost-about-to-slip-off-my-head!) –and I agree with you about that wavy cast-on. I did the leopard version of that Zion hat too (and another two as gifts –beastly beanies?) but knit it in the round to avoid that seam… I was overall happy with it but I do feel a bit like a conehead in it! (no doubt the double stitching of the leopard print onto it made it even bulkier though…I should probably do one in a solid colour like yours!) I’m in Canada so warm hats get a lot of use!

    All three of these look awesome on you though! This past winter my go-to hat was that BT skiff hat…I think I’d knit that one again. I do feel like in almost EVERY hat I’ve knit there is something about it I’d tweak if I were to do it again. Maybe I have a weird head 😉

    Reply
    • Jen

      Weirdly I swatched for the boyfriend hat, got gauge, then went down a needle size but still it was giant. I think a stiffer yarn would have definitely helped. So smart knitting the Zion hat in the round – if I wasn’t sent the needles I would have bought that size and done it in the round also. I think conehead is an apt description of the hat but I just roll with it. It felt kinda weird at first but I’ve been dressing in a semi-non-standard way since grade school so not much phases me anymore 😉 The skiff is actually in my queue, glad to hear it’s a winner!

      Reply
      • raptinthought

        My Zion Lion makes me a conehead too! My sister called me a Smurf. Well…it’s in fashion so we’re good ;). And some of the pics on Wool and the Gang’s site showed the hat being ginormous, so I’m rather happy mine didn’t turn out that way. I think knitting at that gauge creates the stiffer pointy top with the decreases. Since I have much of the ball of yarn left, I have considered reknitting it at a way looser gauge if I have needles big enough for it. Can’t imagine having the seam in such a bulky yarn though. I knit it in the round to avoid that, but I understand that you followed the pattern as is since they sent it to you. I read they don’t do knitting in the round in their patterns since they are marketing to knew knitters who probably haven’t developed that skill yet? (I learned circular knitting right away when I started.) Have you tried a sweater stone on the pills? With roving yarn, sometimes it just needs a couple of shavings with a stone and then it will stop pilling.

        Reply
  • erniek3

    Everybody knits at a different …..consistency? Weight? Slack? I’m a ….loose knitter? Nobody gets gauge the first time.

    Hats aren’t so big that you can’t frog the damn thing and try it again, or…..make something else. That pattern may be cursed. You may need to perform a ritual. It might involve chocolate. Or alcohol. Whatever works.

    It’s the sweaters that pill up when the swatches didn’t that …well, those needles are sharp and pointy. I swear no one got hurt directly.

    Reply
    • Jen

      Totally agree about swatching, I think the thing that drives me nuts about the third hat is I did swatch, got gauge, then went down another needle size and it’s nowhere close to the measurements they described – and I’m not the only one with this experience. Blah! Definitely that hat is cursed and will not be re-knit ever. I actually don’t even care about ripping it for the yarn – that thing is just over 😉

      The second hat though I probably will rip and re-knit. I’m guessing you had a pilly sweater that did get hurt though! Hahaha!

      Reply
  • Barbara

    Let me start by saying I’m a beanie girl, not a slouch hat girl. The hat I have knitted over and over for gifts, for charity, for emergency hats to live in cars during Wisconsin winters, and for myself is Laurie Perry’s Brangelina Hat. It’s knit with bulky yarn or 2 worsteds held together and big (US9 or 10) needles, and has a nice wide cuff to double over your ears or pull down to cut the wind on your neck. We will not discuss the roll-brim hat I knitted with expensive handspun yarn that works its way down over my face as I walk; it’s soft and warm and big enough for a Yeti. One of these cold winter day I’ll frog it and use the yarn elsewhere.

    I like all your hats and really appreciate the analysis of why things didn’t work the way you’d hoped.

    Reply
    • Jen

      Hahaha it’s always the expensive ones that get you! I’ll have to check that pattern out, it sounds like a great one to have in your pattern arsenal!

      Reply
    • Jen

      One of my favorite hats is 100% alpaca and I love it so much! My mittens also! They’re so warm and soft, I thought it would work but 🙁 🙁 no luck. Maybe I’ll toss it in the wash once we find it and see what happens…

      Reply
  • Catherine

    I knit a sweater and it ended up too small. I didn’t realize that knitting in the round gauge was much tighter than back and forth gauge. Lesson learned. I couldn’t bring myself to tear it out so I bought new yarn for a redo. Maybe my niece can wear the small one when she turns 10 or something.

    Reply
  • Sky Turtle

    All three look really good! I made my first had this year and it turned out huuuge. I made it for my partner who wore out of consideration for my work, but it wasn’t pretty. It was me who forgot it at the bank only a few weeks after it was made. Nobody was sorry…

    Reply
  • Chie (@vivatveritas)

    All the three hats look great on you! It’s hard to tell by pictures that there is anything wrong with any of the hats. I’ve been thinking of knitting the Purl Soho slouchy hat, so thank you for the review!

    Reply
  • julia

    I agree with others that the hats all look good! But I know photos don’t necessarily show overlarge hat problems (slipping down when you move around, that weird loose feel, blowing off in the wind, etc). I like the Slouchy Hat most of all, so I hope you do re-knit it smaller. You can call this one the muslin 😉

    Regarding the Boyfriend Hat pattern, I haven’t tried it myself, but I have an idea about two things that might be contributing to the widespread unpredictable results.

    First, it’s really tough to get an accurate gauge measurement in ribbing, and the hat is all ribbing. The pattern only gives the unstretched gauge, which I guess is a somewhat common practice(?) for all-ribbed items, but isn’t super helpful for a lot of knitters. To get a predictable result, I’d want to see some reference for how stretchy your ribbed fabric should be — two knitters might produce ribbing that has similar unstretched stitch gauge, but different stretchiness. I wish they’d either used the average gauge method (measure totally relaxed, then totally stretched, then average those numbers), or given a percent stretch reference for the gauge (like a sewer would use while shopping for knits). Or explained how to sanity check the stretchiness of your swatch. Or even just warned people that ribbing is hard to measure well, and it stretches, so think about sizing down.

    Second, I think there might actually be a problem with the pattern numbers. If you look at the finished circumferences listed, they don’t scale proportionately between unstretched and “comfortably stretched”. To put it in sewing terms, if we’re to take the pattern at its word, then the smallest size hat is made of a ribbing with 34% stretch, while the largest size is made of a ribbing with 25% stretch. But increasing your stitch count shouldn’t change the stretchiness of the fabric! If you assume that the stretchiness from the smallest size is the correct number for all sizes, that alone makes the “Women’s Medium” finished (stretched) circumference go from 21.5″ to 22.11″ — which lands it squarely in Men’s Medium territory according to standard hat sizing. And the “Women’s Large” goes from 23″ to 24.12″, landing it between a Men’s XL and XXL!

    I also agree about the cast on issues with that pattern. I was trying to remember if they’d explained their choice of cast on at all, but looking at the page now it doesn’t seem to make reference to any specific cast on. Which is odd because I was pretty sure I remembered the pattern recommending a cable cast on (as you said in your post). I know Purl Bee patterns are often aiming for super simple instructions, both because they’re free and because of their marketing strategy, but I get frustrated when I feel like the desire to make the pattern “easy” is outweighing helping knitters make good choices.

    (personally, I’d go with a tubular cast on for a 1×1 rib hat, but there are also simpler options that look tidy and perform well)

    Reply
  • Julia

    I knit both Purl Bee patterns and they both came out too big. I had to sew in a line of elastic thread to make the boyfriend hat work. Alternatively, I find their sewing patterns come out on the small side. I was wondering if it was just me considering how much effort and detail the Purl Bee puts into patterns. Glad I am not alone.

    Reply
  • Celia R

    I love Jenny Gordy’s Ribbstickad, which is one of the most fun things I’ve ever knit (chunky, fast, easy!). I love that simple pleasures hat above…you make me want to knit another one 🙂

    Reply
  • Sarah

    I have two very similar hats to your Love and Hate hats! My Love hat is also a super bulky beanie and I love the way it kinda sticks up at the top like yours does but that pilling is SO SAD. I thought it was just the yarn that I used but I think it’s just the nature of loosely plied yarns like that. The other hat I actually modeled after the boyfriend hat and somewhere between my needle size and the fact that the whole thing is knit in 1×1 rib, it is SO LOOSE and it looks really limp and sad. Might rip it out and make another one but I don’t really every re-do things. I’m too stubborn!

    Reply
  • Meg White

    I have an idea for fixing the two hats that turned out too big. I see that the first one has a turned-up brim, and the other is long enough to turn up a little brim, too. You could sew something into the turned-up brim to make them fit how you want. I was thinking the a strip of stretch fleece inside the wide brim of the first hat would work well, or even regular fleece cut to exactly the right length. Wouldn’t that be warm! I’d sew it between the two layers of knitting and just catch-stitch the brim invisibly to the outside of the hat. On the second hat, if you use a smaller turn-up, you could try a little elastic, maybe 2″ or so. I love to save my knitting projects! Love your blog. 🙂

    Reply
  • Haley

    Ha! I also made the Boyfriend Hat for my boyfriend for Christmas…. which then turned into a Valentines’ Day gift. I was so frustrated after ripping back twice after finishing 50 or so rows of the pattern. I kept going after changing my needle size. It still ended up large…such a bummer!

    Reply
  • Rachel

    What is really funny is that I absolutely love how big that Purl Bee hat is on you. That is exactly the sort of slouch I like! Do you remember which size you followed on the pattern, and what gauge you got with the Worsted Twist? I’d love to know!

    Reply
  • Alicia

    Currently knitting the Boyfriend Hat – using a heavier yarn than what the pattern calls for, and only one colour. I cast on 96 stitches instead of the 144 (!!) that is called for to make a size small. I’ve knit about 4 inches so far, and tried on the hat by transferring to DPNs, and it seems okay. I’m not an experienced knitter, hoping mine turns out, and glad to see your finished hat. I am definitely going to make mine shorter as I’m not a fan of such a pointy/sloppy hat. I really appreciate your honesty as well, thank you!

    Reply

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