Appliqué Linden Tutorial

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Today I have another Linden Sweatshirt tutorial for you, I’ll be demonstrating how to appliqué your Linden with a fun phrase or word. I’ve been seeing sweatshirts pop up for sale with appliquéd phrases on them, usually either French or funny, but I thought it would be fun to make one of my own! You should have most of the supplies to make this sitting around with the exception of perhaps the fusible and stabilizer but it’s a great project for using up great print scraps leftover from other projects. So lets gather our supplies and jump in!

Project Supplies

 

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Start by brainstorming a few words or phrases you might want written across your Linden. Try out different fonts and see what you like. I like to place my text on top of the front of the shirt to test the size, just remember that you have to stitch around every edge of your lettering so simple is best. Although it’s cute, something like the bonjour would be a lot of stitching.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

After you decide on your text, you’ll need to reverse the type and cut it out. You can either reverse it on the computer in an editing program such as Photoshop or Illustrator, or you can cut your letters the right way round and flip them over.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Now we need to prep the fabric you’ll be using for your lettering. Press your fabric and cut a piece of double sided fusible large enough for your text. Fuse the non-papered side of it to the wrong side of the fabric according to the instructions included.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Trace your lettering onto the paper side of your fused fabric and cut it out. When you flip the letters fabric side up they’ll be the right way around because we traced them out upside down.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Peel the paper backing off your letters and arrange them how you’d like them to appear on the front of your shirt. I find a ruler or two very helpful at this stage. With the paper removed the letters should be just slightly sticky – enough to get you over to the iron to affix the letters. If this isn’t the case you can stick a pin through each letter until you’re at your ironing board.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Cover your letters with a press cloth and iron the letters to set the fusible. Again follow the instructions that came with your interfacing for this step.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Since were going to be stitching on top of a knit fabric we’ll need something to keep the knit fabric from moving around and stretching out of shape, this is where your tear away stabilizer comes in. Cut a piece large enough to cover all your text, I cut mine about 3/4″ larger than the block. Place it behind the text and pin it in place.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Our next step is stitching around the letters using a zig zag stitch. Before you start on your shirt, it’s not a bad idea to do a practice letter to get your stitch length and with in order, practice turning, and decide on a thread color. I used regular thread for this but if you happen to have embroidery thread laying around you’ll get a much finer outline around your letters.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Once you’ve worked out your stitch, start outlining your letters. When it comes time to pivot, make sure your needle is at the outer corner before you turn your work as in the photos above. This will ensure that you’re properly in line when starting the next row of stitching. Continue with this until all letters are outlined.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

After you’ve completed stitching around your letters you’ll need to anchor your threads since backtacking isn’t a great option when you want a neat and even stitching line. Pull your threads to the back of the shirt, tie them off, then thread the ends through the stitching with a needle. Clip your excess thread tails.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline StudioAppliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Now it’s time to remove your stabilizer from the back of your shirt. It should tear right off, don’t worry too much about tearing your threads.

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

Appliqué Linden Tutorial | Grainline Studio

That’s it for the appliqué section of the shirt, now assemble the rest of your Linden according to the pattern instructions!

14 replies on “Appliqué Linden Tutorial

  • Mary Beth

    You can use KK2000 to temporarily get the letters to stick in place….not sure you want to iron the letters while the KK2000 is active. But KK2000 disappears after 24 hours. What else? I would use 30 weight rayon thread on the outline stitch so that the stitching really pops. If you’ve a satin stitch option on your sewing machine, this would be a great time to use it. You could further embellish your alphabet wizardry with rhinestones, fabric paint, etc. Maybe test out these on scraps before you go all out on your precious garment.

    Reply
  • LauraJ

    I made an applique Christmas sweatshirt this past December with view B of the Linden! I got some french terry in the mail that was disappointingly bright red (I was looking forward to dark red), but i appliqued a plaid Christmas tree on the front and it worked out great. I wish I had known about the tear-away interfacing, though, that would have polished it up a bit. I’ll just have to do more applique! Thanks so much for this!

    Reply
  • lizzy

    Can’t wait to try this on a shirt! When I’ve appliqued lettering on home wares before, I trace straight onto the paper side of the bondaweb (with lettering reversed) instead if cutting out each letter. You can see through it enough to do this. If you can’t reverse the lettering you can tape the original, wrong side towards you on to a window to act as a light box! Then trace over as before

    Reply
  • Chris

    I love the Linden, but on the first one I made, the neckline is too wide for me. (I have a narrow shoulder area.) I was wondering if you could do a tutorial on how to make the neckline narrower by 1 or 2 inches.
    Chris

    Reply
  • Edie

    I’ve been waiting for my Linden obsession to fade, but this ensures a whole new world of possibilities! Thank you, I think. Could you share the font you used for OUI! and the height of your letters? I want to do MEOW and replace the O with a cat head silhouette.

    Reply

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