Cascade Duffle Coat

Cascade Duffle Coat | Grainline Studio

I’m so beyond excited to finally announce that the Cascade Duffle Coat pattern is now a reality! It’s a big pattern with lots to talk about so I’m going to launch right in. If you have any questions let me know in the comments below!

Cascade Duffle Coat | Grainline Studio

GARMENT DETAILS

First lets talk about the design elements of the pattern. From the pattern envelope…

“The Cascade Duffle Coat is a fresh take on a classic shape featuring a slight A-line cut, toggle front closure, and a hidden zipper band to keep the coat shut tight against cold weather. The hem of View A hits at the hip while View B’s falls to mid-thigh. Although View A is shown with a collar and View B with a hood, both are interchangeable allowing you to create your own perfect coat.”

Some people love hoods and hate collars, some people hate collars and love hoods. I wanted to make sure that if you’re making a pattern this involved that you have the choice between the two. The collar is generous enough that you can flip it up against the cold if you need to – I occasionally flip up the back collar and leave the front edges down.

As for the hood, we went through a few iterations together. It was important to me that the hood felt warm and roomy and could accommodate a scarf at the neck, but also wasn’t so roomy that it would blow off in the wind.

Cascade Duffle Coat | Grainline Studio

Another detail I took into consideration was the hidden zipper which you can see in the above photo of the first version of this coat. While the zipper band is optional I really like having it in a winter coat, especially in a city as windy as Chicago. The toggles keep things closed but the zipper keeps them closed tight.

Cascade Duffle Coat | Grainline Studio

SUGGESTED FABRICS

“Medium to heavy weight coating fabrics such as melton, boiled, or felted wool. View A can alternately be made up in canvas or twill for a lighter weight jacket. Recommended lining is rayon bemberg or a similar fabric. If you’d like a pop of color or pattern try cutting your hood lining and zipper bands from flannel.”

I’ll be doing a post about selecting the supplies for this coat soon but in the meantime you may want to refer to this post I did with Britex about selecting fabrics for a coat.

NOTIONS

Thread, 6 toggle buttons, View A: 18” separating zipper, View B: 22” separating zipper

I designed this coat so that the toggles and zippers can be purchased at any large craft store with no alterations to them. I’ve got a post planned out on making your own as well which I love doing. Good toggles can be hard to find but I’ve got a few sources I’ll be sharing, nothing groundbreaking but it’s always helpful to have a roundup.

Cascade Duffle Coat | Grainline Studio

PATTERN DIFFICULTY

The Cascade Duffle Coat has an Advanced rating for a few reasons. Honestly all sewing is made up of sewing, pressing, and trimming (if needed) one seam after another so if you take things one step at a time it’s really no harder than any other pattern. The reasons the Cascade is rated advanced are…

  • There are 40 pattern pieces between View A & View B which is a lot to deal with and keep track of.
  • Between the two views there are about 60 steps which could be overwhelming and take more time than a more basic project. Take them one step at a time though and you’re good to go.
  • The suggested fabric is wool and you need between 2 3/4yds – 4 1/8yds depending on which view and size you’re making. This means you have the potential to spend more than your average amount on the supplies for this.

Due to these things and certain techniques like bagging a lining (which is super easy once you get the hang of it but seems completely bizarre and ill fated at first) I didn’t want to rate the coat Intermediate and have anyone put so much time and money into it just to have a failed project. I think it’s more than just a step up from a basic tank in sewing responsibility, though in all honesty the difficulty really comes from the compounding of steps and not one thing in particular.

Cascade Duffle Coat | Grainline Studio

MEASUREMENTS & YARDAGE

Cause I know you guys are going to want these…

 

Cascade Duffle Coat | Grainline Studio

For a contrasting hood / yoke like I did in View B, you’ll need approximately 1 yd of the contrasting fabric for all sizes.

ABOUT THE SIZE OF THE PATTERN

I feel like I need to talk a little bit the sheer size of this pattern. If you’ve checked out the Cascade in the shop you’ll notice that it’s quite large. The reason for this is 1. it’s a coat with two views, but 2. it’s the way the linings are drafted. I could have easily saved about 30 pages (and a lot of money at the printer) by having the coat lined with the same pattern as the shell but that completely negates the point of the lining and I couldn’t do that. The lining needs to be larger than the shell in order to do it’s job of protecting the coat from stress and allowing you to get in and out of it easily. The lining is the cheap part, the part that you would replace when it wears out before the coat (because it’s doing its job of protecting the coat). If the lining isn’t protecting the shell as it should, there’s just really no point unless you’re after extra warmth. In that case I recommend interlining the coat and inserting the lining as drafted.

That said, each of the the downloadable pattern file options are broken into 3 files.

  • View A & B: This file contains the pattern pieces required whether you’re making View A or View B as well as the hood and collar pieces so you can switch those up without having to print additional pages. You will need to print this file no matter which view you’re making.
  • View A: This file contains the pieces specific to View A, you only need to print this to make View A.
  • View B: This file contains the pieces specific to View B, you only need to print this to make View B.

Well, that’s all I can think of for now. I’ve been wearing my grey version since November, 2012 and my other two versions since winter of last year and they’re all still going strong, even through last year’s Polar Vortex. I’ll be starting a sew along soon (I think people are going to want one for this coat) so we can start rolling along shortly!

*I’ve also got vest & cotton twill variations planned.

71 replies on “Cascade Duffle Coat

  • Caroline

    This is a brilliant pattern Jen. I am almost through making my first ever wool coat so when (if) I finish it before the change of season I would love to try the cute View A with collar – the print placement on this is awesome!!

    Reply
  • Melissa

    Yes! Thank you for taking the time to make the lining its own pieces. I spent a lot of time a few years ago making my own winter coat from a Simplicity pattern that had the lining and outer pattern pieces the same, and needless to say I had to replace the lining this year because the original lining got completely stressed/ripped.

    Reply
    • Jen

      It’s such a ripoff when the pieces are the same. I actually debated because it seems like every pattern company keeps them the same to keep costs down but I knew it wasn’t right and that weird neurotic part of my brain just wouldn’t let me do it. I made this coat in Nov 2011 (https://grainlinestudio.com/2011/11/21/moorland-melton-wool-coat/) and I only just have needed to replace my lining this year after near constant cool weather wear, and I am super hard on my handmade garments. It really is worth it

      Reply
  • Melissa

    Yes! I’ve been waiting for this pattern since I saw a teaser some time ago! I have made a scaled down Albion, which I love, but having a strict woman’s version (in plaid!) is going to be awesome.

    Reply
  • Michelle Rose

    I absolutely love this. I held off on making the Albion because of it being a unisex pattern and the lack of a zipper. Thanks for offering the paper version of this, too. I prefer PDFs for simple tops and things like that, but for a garment this complex, I’d rather have the printed/paper version.

    Reply
  • Nina

    YEAH! I’ve been waiting and waiting! I’m usually all about the PDFs but I definitely want a hard copy of this – do you know which shops in the UK are going to stock it, and when the stock will reach them? If any of them want to offer pre-orders, I’m game… Also, will it work to line the body in Viyella (lightweight wool/cotton flannel-type fabric), and just put the slippery stuff in the sleeves? Ooh, it’s so exciting!

    Reply
    • Francesca a

      I’m not the creator, but I can tell you it would work – as my sewing hero, Vintage Belle, does just that and says the only necessary slip is in the sleeves:). But pray, do tell, where on earth do you find Viyella? I love that stuff and haven’t seen it for yonks!

      Reply
  • Carly

    I’m super excited about this pattern! I’m far away from being an advanced sewer but I want to make one so badly! Can’t wait for the Sewalong to start. Congratulations, the cascade is amazing!

    Reply
  • kelly t

    Oh my, this is really a beautiful coat- I especially love your red plaid version of it. I’ve never sewn a coat before, but I’m tempted to give it a try because its just so beautiful!

    Reply
  • Tasha @ By Gum, By Golly

    Can one tear up with happiness upon seeing a new pattern release? Because I totally almost did. 😀 And a little part of me wants to just put every single sewing and knitting project aside so that I can participate in the sew-along. I could totally see either the short or long version with some cigarette pants and a Breton top. Modern or vintage. Totally love it. Jen, you have so hit it out of the ballpark!!

    Reply
  • May

    Congratulations!! This is so exciting and what a beautiful pattern. I so admire all the hard work you’ve put in and I can’t wait to sew this up!

    Reply
  • Becky Simpson

    That is an awesome coat! I may not be able to do the sewalong, but I would definitely follow along. Having access to it when I start would be so helpful. Good Job!

    Reply
  • juebejue

    Omg YES! I’ve been waiting for this to come out since a year (or is it two) ago when you first showed your coat!!! It’s a little too late in the winter for me to sew this but next winter!! Woohoo!!!

    Reply
  • Jenny

    So fun! After making two miniature versions for my favorite kids now I want to make my own.. I’m really a size 20 but I reckon I could grade up pretty easily

    Reply
  • lisa g

    I’m so excited for this coat! Can. not. wait. to get to work on mine. Also, sooo grateful that you have printed patterns now! I look forward to your future posts about this one.

    Reply
  • Rose

    Ahhhh this is so good! It’s the height of summer where I am but this is definitely getting added to the winter sewing list. Until then I’m looking forward to seeing everyone’s finished versions!

    Reply
  • /anne...

    I just bought some green and raspberry plaid wool blend to make a coat for my daughter, who is a new teacher (the school year here in Australia starts in January). It can get very cold and windy here in Melbourne. I was thinking Duffle – you read my mind!

    I wouldn’t mind making a detachable quilted lining for the body, so she could get more wear out of it – would that be hard to do? My fabric isn’t terribly thick, so I’m planning on fusing it to add warmth and weight.

    Reply
    • Jen

      I don’t think it would be terribly hard, if you happen to have a similar coat on hand to reference how it was done that would be the easiest way. I like the idea of the detachable lining though!

      Reply
      • /anne...

        Serious coats are uncommon in Australia – despite the fact that it can get miserably cold in the southern states in winter. My French teacher (who was English) used to say that Melbourne was colder than the Russian Steppes. Ok, so no permafrost here, but Melbourne winters are damp.

        I remember an article in Threads years ago, but unfortunately I’ve never seen one in real life.

        Reply
  • Laura

    Will the visible pieces of the jacket (sleeves, back, front, over collar, front yoke, back yoke, center band, pockets) fit in 1.6m of 60″ wide fabric for view A? How about if I were to do the two yokes & the pockets in a contrast color?

    Reply
    • Jen

      Maybe if it were a solid color and a very small size. I almost got View A (sz 4) with the collar out of a 60″ wide 1.5yd piece of wool but had to do welt pockets instead of patch and a contrast under collar. If you were doing the yokes and pockets contrast you’d have a better chance.

      Reply
  • Francesca a

    I love this, especially the short version, and the zip addition is genius. I used to love my Gloverall duffle coats except for the flipping let in the wind toggles….. will be buying the print version as soon as the pay comes in!
    congrats for yet anotehr thoughtful pattern.

    Reply
  • Pootle and Make

    Another winner. Your patterns are so wearable I can see this in every wardrobe. Both variations are so cute. I just finished a gerard coat which had 18 pattern pieces. Maybe I can handle 40 now!

    Reply
  • sallie

    This. Is. FANTASTIC!!!
    Thank you so much Jen!!! This is truly the coat of my dreams! I’m putting this on my list for next fall (because it’s already to warm in Texas… boo)

    Reply
  • Wendy

    Thank you! Thank you! Thank you for providing a copy shop version in A0 for all your International customers. If I didn’t love this pattern enough already, that was what really sold it for me.
    I have been looking forward to this since you showed your original grey version, and so many people asked if it might become a pattern. It was definitely worth the wait!!

    Reply
  • kristin

    Aw Jen I am so excited about this coat!! It looks awesome and I love how much thought you put into all the details. Since Portland has a pretty mild climate and we’re heading into springtime, I’m looking forward to seeing your twill version. I have never made a coat for myself but love making them for my kids, but I love your patterns and think this would be a great place to start! Congrats on the release!!

    Reply
  • Gay

    You nailed it! I finally replaced my beloved threadbare fur trimmed hooded GW ‘pattern’ coat with your lovely Cascade Duffle Coat pattern! Beautiful work! Thank you!

    Reply
  • Stef

    Beautiful! Would love to attempt this! Wondering if I *have* to have the toggles in order for it to stay closed properly, or if I can just get by with the zipper? Just for a plainer version?

    Reply
    • Jen

      The front band might be a bit wide to stay closed without toggles regularly, that said, sometimes when I’m feeling lazy I wear mine without the toggles done up. You could always forgo the zipper and use the front bands as button bands instead or attach a hidden or magnetic closure.

      Reply
  • Barb Prestidge

    we want a duffle coat pattern and tried to get one from dress and me in New Zealand where we live and have had no reply from them can you give us a phone number for them that would help me

    Reply
  • Chloe

    Hi Jen

    I live in Canada where it can get pretty cold in winter. I’m planning on sewing this coat in thick wool fabric and lining it with polar fleece / fake fur. You recommend using interfacing, is it important for the success of the whole sewing thing or is it just to add extra warmth? Thank you!

    Reply
    • Jen

      I think you might be thinking of interlining, which is another layer added to add warmth. Interfacing is just to add strength to certain areas of the coat so that it withstands wear. It doesn’t have anything to do with warmth and is important to the success of the garment in my opinion. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  • Lynne

    Hi Jen, I’ve got 3 questions for you:
    1) How much warmer is melton vs. boiled wool?
    2) How windproof is this coat
    3) What is the coldest temperature you’ve worn this coat in? And did it keep you warm?

    I’d really like to give this coat a try but it doesn’t look like it would stand up to the Canadian elements 🙁

    Thanks!

    Reply
    • Jen

      Hi Lynne-

      Melton wool is wool that has been woven, then felted while Boiled wool is wool that has been knit, then felted. I think the thing that will make the difference for you is the fiber content percentages (they both usually tend to have another fiber blended in) and the thickness, not whether it’s Melton or Boiled. It might be easier to find thicker melton, but I have seen some pretty thick boiled wool, just not as frequently. I’d opt for the highest wool percentage you can find, or try one that’s blended with alpaca or cashmere for extra warmth. The coat is only as wind proof as the materials you use so that’s a hard one to answer. If you use a light wool and lining it will be less wind proof than if you used a dense, heavy wool and thicker lining. That said it’s probably not going to be as warm or wind proof as a down coat like something made by Canadian Goose or Patagonia. You can’t really make those yourself though, so I guess it just depends how warm you need to be vs how much you want to make a coat. You can interline the coat with Thinsulate, I would recommend going up a size though because the bulk will make the coat slightly smaller. Unfortunately I can’t warmth rate these coats since everything depends on the materials you select. I have a double faced melton version lined with Bemberg (thin rayon) and I’ve worn that in negative Fahrenheit temperatures with seasonally appropriate clothing and been just fine, but again, I can’t guarantee any sort of warmth rating for you.

      Jen

      Reply

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